3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, October 28

Paper Presentation: Parent/Caregiver Experience — A Systematic Review and Meta-Analytic Evaluation of Psychosocial Interventions in Parents of Children with Cancer: A Focus on Minority Outcomes (204-3)

Much progress has been made in developing interventions to address psychosocial distress in parents of children with cancer. Racial/ethnic minorities may be more prone to psychosocial distress, and little is known about intervention response among these parents. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of psychosocial interventions on anxiety and depression outcomes for parents of children with cancer, with a focus on racial/ethnic minorities. Read more...
3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, October 28

Paper Presentation: Parent/Caregiver Experience — An Exploration of Experiences with the COVID-19 Pandemic in Parents of Children with Cancer (204-2)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a global pandemic that has caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The uncertainty of COVID-19 may lead to significant mental health consequences for childhood cancer survivors and children experiencing cancer treatment, as well as their parents.

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Speaker:
Micah Skeens, PhD APRN
CNE Hours
1
3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, October 28

Paper Presentation: Parent/Caregiver Experience — It Can Be Hard But It's Not Bad': Documenting Caregiver Perceptions of Benefits/Burdens to Participating in Pediatric Palliative Care Research (204-1)

Documenting the benefits and burdens of pediatric palliative care research on children and their families could yield new knowledge relevant to study methods and allay uneasiness among clinicians and institutional review board members about pediatric palliative care research.

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Speaker:
Cheryl Reggio, BN-PC RN CPON®
CNE Hours
1
2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, October 30

Perspectives on supporting schooling for children with cancer: Findings from two PCORI Engagement Projects (230)

Education is an important social determinant of health, and treatment for childhood cancers can result in long-term neurocognitive effects (deficits in processing speed, working memory, executive function, and attention), which are associated with reduced educational attainment, employment, and ability to live independently.

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3:30 – 4:30 pm Friday, October 29

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — The End of Treatment and Beyond: Integrating Components of Adolescent to Adult Healthcare Transition into Patient Care (219-2)

Survival rates for childhood cancer have greatly increased as a result of therapeutic advances. Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are a challenging and dynamic cohort that require innovative, supportive care to foster knowledge and skills related to their cancer and healthcare transition.

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3:30 – 4:30 pm Friday, October 29

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — Supporting Adolescent & Young Adult Early Survivors of Childhood Cancer Through Health Care Transitions (219-1)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer face unique challenges as they transition from active cancer-directed therapy to early survivorship. Developmentally at this age, the autonomy and decision-making capacity of these patients increases, and their priorities shift to a focus on issues such as school, career, and relationships.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Friday, October 29

Joint Topic: Developing Successful AYA and Oncofertility Programs Nuts & Bolts of Implementing an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program in the Pediatric Setting (213-1)

What have we learned over the last decade since the implementation of an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program? In this session, we will identify the unique needs of the AYA population and describe the evolving structure of our program to meet those needs.

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5:00 – 6:00 pm Thursday, October 28

“It’s my Body!”: Engaging Children and Adolescents Through Goals of Care Discussions on End of Life (206)

Childhood and adolescence are a time to navigate autonomy, yet our medical system looks to parents to make “official” decisions until children are 18 years old. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children and adolescents with life-limiting illnesses be provided an opportunity to participate in decisions affecting their care in a developmentally appropriate manner.

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