Saturday, September 17

All session times are in Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), UTC -4
8:30 am – 9:30 am

General Session: APHON Advocacy: Ask, Tell, Ask (104)

This session will outline the basics of advocacy and APHON’s Advocacy Agenda. Opportunities for engagement in advocacy will be described along with their associated time commitments. A demonstration of making a legislative “ask” will be performed to provide attendees with the tools and confidence they need to advocate for APHON’s priorities locally and nationally.
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: What We All Need to Know (224)

In 2021, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM), released the report Future of Nursing (FON) 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. This most recent report is the third report on the future of nursing, initially created with the sponsorship of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) published in 2011 (National Academy of Sciences). Nurses at all levels need to be familiar with the needs of the profession and how they can get involved and make a difference for themselves and their patients.
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Pediatric Anticoagulation: Who, What, When, Where, and Why (and a little How) (225) 

Pediatric anticoagulation can present challenges to the advanced practice nurse (as well as the ambulatory or bedside nurse) with limited experience in the broad scope of clinical scenarios where either prophylactic or treatment anticoagulation is recommended (it's not just clots). Traditionally, the only pharmacologic options utilized in children have been limited to heparin (including low molecular weight heparin) and warfarin. However, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now being incorporated in a limited fashion, dependent on both age of the child and clinical application.
10:30 am – 11:30 am

Nutritional Support: Best Practices for Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Patients (226)

Nutrition is vital for children to grow and thrive. This is especially important in children with conditions requiring blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) who receive prolonged, intensive therapy requiring optimal overall health and nutritional status (Baumgartner, 2017). Chemotherapy is associated with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, taste changes, mucositis, and increased catabolic demands (McMillen et al., 2020). Malnutrition rates in the pediatric oncology/BMT population range from 6 to 50% (McMillen et al, 2020), and this can have significant consequences.