11:30 am–12:30 pm Friday, September 6

Livers, Kidneys, and Germ Cells – Oh My! Helping Nurses Understand the Children’s Oncology Group Approach to Unique Childhood Cancers (C217)

coglogoLiver, kidney (renal cell carcinoma), and germ cell tumors are rare cancer diagnoses in children and adolescents (Ward E., et al 2014). Enrollment on clinical trials is essential for the continued improvements in outcomes for children with cancer; however, uncommon childhood malignancies make the conduct of these trials a significant challenge (Czauderna P., et al 2016).

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

It's Time to Expect More: Developing Leadership Skills at all Levels (227)

Leadership in pediatric hematology-oncology nursing can be found in many capacities. Nurses are leaders at the bedside, in a charge nurse role, in evidence-based practice and other unit-based projects, in provider roles, in manager and director roles, etc. Nurses in this field tend to be motivated to move the profession forward, and it is important that those who aspire to “lead” in any of these roles be given the tools to be successful.

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4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

2nd Victims in Health Care: What does it mean and how is it affecting Nurses (219)

In an era of healthcare transformation, where transparency and high reliability are paramount concepts, the ideal healthcare providers are always held to is “do no harm.” Nurses continue to be the most trusted professionals and are held to very high standards, and with this comes the risk or consequence of losing that trust with any lapse in judgment, miss in critical thinking, or plainly being overworked or overwhelmed. In this session, we will look to explore the concept of the 2nd victim, which is when healthcare workers are involved in an adverse patient event and subsequently are traumatized by the event.

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Friday, September 6

High Dollar Medications and Therapies: Challenges for our Families and Challenges for Us! (215)

Treatment options for children with cancer continue to grow and bring exciting opportunities for a cure in situations where there was previously no hope. Some therapies come at a very high cost. At the same time, the cost of health care in the United States continues to grow. The complexity of healthcare reimbursement includes varied payment options, including governmental programs; commercial insurance, which can range from excellent coverage to a high deductible plan; and sometimes nontraditional methods of payment, such as shared ministry programs or “self-pay.”

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Speaker:
Kaye Schmidt, MA RN NEA-BC CPHON®
CNE Hours
1
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Global Health in Pediatric Oncology: A Practical Guide for Nurses (209)

In high-income countries (HIC), the survival of childhood cancer has reached over 80% in recent years. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), where the majority of the world’s children with cancer live, survival remains around 20%. Many hospitals and organizations in HICs have partnered with those in LMICs to help bridge this survival gap. Frequently, nurses from HICs who participate in these efforts have limited experience working in limited-resource settings.

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4:35–4:55 pm Friday, September 6

Paper Presentation: Clinical Care Topics — Acuity Measurement of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant Care Using the Complexity Assessment and Monitoring to Ensure Optimal Outcomes (CAMEO) Tool (222-2)

As advances in treatment options for hematology/oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (Heme/Onc/HSCT) patients have evolved, the complexity of patient needs has also increased. Understanding nursing care beyond frequency and time required for “tasks” is necessary to fully inform the dialogue about professional practice models, nursing staffing decisions, and allocation of resources to best serve the needs of this complex patient population.

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Speaker:
Pamela Dockx, BSN RN CPON®
CNE Hours
0.33
5:40–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Paper Presentation: Evidence-Based Practice Projects and Quality Improvement Initiatives — Partners in practice: Utilizing QI methodology to enhance collaboration between bedside nursing and nurse leaders to decrease medication errors (210-3)

Administration of high-risk medications is a core competency for pediatric hematology/oncology nurses. Medication errors have significant adverse effects (AE), further complicating already complex treatment. Nurses involved with adverse drug events (ADEs) are at risk to develop second-victim symptoms. Our team developed and implemented a nursing intervention utilizing quality improvement processes to enhance collaboration between bedside nurses and unit leadership. We aimed to decrease medication errors and near misses by 20%. We exceeded our project goal. Read more...
Speaker:
Mindy Bibart, MSN RN NE-BC CPHON®
CNE Hours
0.33
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