7:30 – 8:30 am Friday, September 6

General Session: Controversies and Conundrums in the Use of Opioids in AYAs with Cancer (102)

This interactive session will equip pediatric oncology nurses with the skills that are essential in managing cancer pain while preventing abuse and diversion in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer. The first half of the session will include advanced didactic content on the pharmacologic management of pain. Opioids, coanalgesics, equianalgesic conversion, and opioid rotation will be reviewed. The second half will be devoted to complex cases with information about successful models to use when managing patients with or at risk for opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion. Improvs will be used to illustrate difficult conversations with patients who demonstrate aberrant behaviors. Read more...
Speaker:
Jeannine Brant, PhD APRN AOCN FAAN
CNE Hours
1
4:05–4:25 pm Thursday, September 5

Paper Presentation: Education Across the Cancer Care Continuum — Evidence-Based Interprofessional Palliative Care Education: Lessons for Pediatric Oncology Clinicians (204-2)

Clinician education and expertise in palliative care vary widely across pediatric oncology programs, creating disparities in accessing and delivering much-needed services to children and their families. Providing interprofessional, onsite team training, as well as institution-wide support for ongoing palliative care education, is critical to improving quality of life for pediatric oncology care recipients.

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Speaker:
Sarah Green, MSN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
1
11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

Beyond the Cure: The Children’s Oncology Group Uses Evidence and Clinical Trials to Study Late Effects in Childhood Cancer Survivors (C229)

coglogoChildhood cancer survivors are living longer than ever before, with overall survival rates exceeding 80%. As a result, survivors are living with chronic late health effects related to their curative treatments. Late effects may include second malignancies, endocrinopathies, cardiomyopathy, infertility, pulmonary function deficits, renal/ocular/auditory disorders, neurocognitive deficits, and metabolic syndrome.

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Speaker:
Eleanor Hendershot, MN BScN RN(EC)
CNE Hours
1
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Infant ALL: Rearranged for the Big Screen! Providing Care on COG AALL15P1, Nurses in a Leading Role! (C211)

coglogoAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric malignancy, with 5-year overall survival rates exceeding 90% (Hunger, Lu, Devidas, Camitta, Gaynon, Winick, 2012). Unfortunately, infants with ALL are an exception to the improving survival trends and remain one of the most challenging populations in pediatric hematology/oncology (Kotecha, Gottardo, Kees, Cole, 2014).

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3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Navigating 131I-MIBG and CAR T 19, in COG trials ANBL1531 and AALL1721: Sharing Care and Strategies for Success (C205)

coglogoThe Children’s Oncology Group (COG) is committed to improving outcomes for pediatric oncology patients with the high-risk disease through clinical trials. Despite tremendous advancements in pediatric oncology treatment, survival in two patient populations remains inferior. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma have a projected 3-year event-free survival of 73% (Park et al., 2016), and patients with precursor B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with positive minimal residual disease at the end of consolidation have a projected 5-year disease-free survival of 39% (Borowitz et al., 2015).

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2:15–3:15 pm Saturday, September 7

A New Tool for Documenting the Child's Report of Cancer Treatment Toxicity (230)

The National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the standard lexicon for grading adverse events (AEs) in oncology trials. Children with cancer experience significant numbers of subjective AEs such as fatigue, pain, or sadness. The current standard is that AEs are reported only by clinicians, even though 30% of the 790 CTCAE items are subjective.

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

The Autoimmune Cytopenias: Deactivating the Self-Destruct Sequence (225)

Autoimmune cytopenias include autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), autoimmune neutropenia (AIN), and Evan’s syndrome (ES). This diverse group of hematologic disorders is characterized by the production of autoantibodies by the patient’s own immune system against hematopoietic cells in the blood or bone marrow.

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Speaker:
Karyn Brundige, MSN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: An Overview (221)

Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, or “ITP,” is one of the most common causes of symptomatic thrombocytopenia in children and adolescents. Clinical presentation and course, epidemiology, diagnostic modalities and criteria, treatment options, and long-term sequelae will be reviewed with attention to the nurse/advanced practice nurse who desires a comprehensive overview of the subject. Case studies will be utilized to highlight the frequent clinical variance of the condition. Read more...
4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

CLABSIs in Pediatric Hem/Onc/BMT Patients – Why Aren’t We at Zero, and Will We Ever Get There? (220)

Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) continue to be an important source of morbidity for children with cancer and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant. As many institutions strive to achieve rates of zero, nurses need to be aware of distinct challenges involving the pediatric hematology/oncology/transplant population.

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Speaker:
Lauri Linder, PhD APRN CPON®
CNE Hours
1
4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

Advances in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology in the Molecular Era (218)

Pediatric CNS tumors as a group represent the most common solid tumor in childhood and encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Recent advances in molecular profiling have led to significant changes in the classification of pediatric CNS tumors, with a positive impact on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Gliomas have undergone reclassification with emphasis on molecular profile over histology, leading to a redefinition of traditional low-grade versus high-grade glioma.

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Speaker:
Cheryl Fischer, MSN RN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
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