Displaying items by tag: Hematology

Creating a Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Manuscript to Submit for Publication in a Nursing Journal (003)

3.25CNE  Increasing numbers of pediatric oncology nurses are completing advanced degrees, including the DNP and PhD. These nurses are advancing nursing discipline, science, evidence, and clinical practice by publishing their scholarly work. The experience of publishing in a professional nursing journal can be confusing and overwhelming to both novice and seasoned authors.
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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

They Just Don’t Get It! Unconscious Bias in Caring for Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders (232)

1CNE  Caring for a child with serious illness, especially when cure is uncertain, may be one of the most difficult and yet most rewarding experiences for all members of the healthcare team. This presentation examines how unconscious bias, or our personal “blind spot”, from the perspectives of the hematology/oncology team, family members, and palliative care team interferes with the ability of the to accept and integrate palliative care for children with high-risk and advanced hematologic or oncologic diagnoses.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Transfusions in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients: As Easy As ABO (231)

1CNE  Transfusion of blood products is an essential part of caring for children with benign hematologic disorders, malignant diseases, and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One challenge in pediatric patients is the broad age range for patients that span from neonates to young adults. Recent studies have shown that there is a wide variability in practice among pediatric programs in the indications for transfusions, CMV prevention, and management of patients who become refractory to transfusions.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Comprehensive Care for Thalassemia (226)

1CNE  Thalassemia is becoming a more common diagnosis seen in pediatric hematology/oncology centers. The term thalassemia describes a group of very complex diseases that requires thorough, comprehensive care to improve outcomes and quality of life for these patients. A complicating factor is that patients often are immigrants or refugees with language and cultural barriers and other socioeconomic issues. The care of these patients require a multidisciplinary approach and a strong understanding of the pathophysiology, specific complications, current treatments, and new and emerging therapies.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Connecting Fun with Purpose: Interactive Teaching Strategies to Improve Bedside Care (225)

1CNE  The complex field of pediatric hematology/oncology truly demands clinical expertise of the bedside nurse to safely care for patients. Nurse educators are challenged more than ever to provide education in the classroom that will translate to meaningful application at the bedside (Curran, 2014). Current literature promotes learner preparation prior to class coupled with in-class interactive learning to apply and solidify knowledge (Galway, Corbett, Takaro, Tairyan, & Frank, 2014; Vujovic, 2016).

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3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Beyond the Cure: The Children’s Oncology Group’s Efforts to Improve Outcomes for Pediatric Cancer Patients Long after Treatment has Finished (C223)

coglogo1CNE  Childhood cancer survivors are living longer than ever before, with overall survival rates exceeding 80%. As a result, survivors also are living with chronic late health effects related to their curative treatments, with 40% of survivors experiencing a severe, disabling, and life-threatening or fatal late effect at 30 years post-treatment. Late effects may include second malignancies, endocrinopathies, cardiomyopathy, infertility, pulmonary function deficits, renal/ocular/auditory disorders, neurocognitive deficits, and metabolic syndrome. Recent studies report that cumulative incidence of late effects may be even higher than previously reported, with survivors having 3 to 5 treatment-related chronic health conditions by the age of 50.

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3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Running on Empty: Inherited Bone Marrow Failure (219)

1CNE Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of hematologic disorders. Despite the name, some children have new, not inherited, genetic mutations. These mutations can result in congenital abnormalities or disease in specific organs or increased cancer predisposition. Through a series of patient vignettes we will follow six patients with common syndromes highlighting clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and evidence-based treatment and monitoring recommendations. We also will explore the impact of a genetic diagnosis on the psychological and social well-being of families as the parents grapple with the decision whether to pursue genetic testing for themselves or their other children.

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3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Never a Dull Moment: Latest and Greatest Clinical Pearls for the APN (218)

1CNE  Advanced practice providers (APP) are consistently challenged to have the most current information on diagnosis, treatment, therapy delivery strategies, adverse effects management, and nursing led research from throughout the trajectory of a disorder. The purpose of this session is to provide APP-specific education and networking related to the complexities of children diagnosed with a hematological or oncological disorder. First, a quick primer on how to read and interpret peripheral blood smears and bone marrow biopsies, which will help with initial diagnoses of hematology and liquid tumors. After an initial diagnosis is made, genomic profiling of both liquid and solid tumors is increasingly utilized to identify molecular targets. The role of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in the ordering and interpretation of these tests will be explained. Next, the intricate transition from identification of mutations to selection of mutational targets with current medications in brain tumors will be discussed. In addition, the monitoring and treatment of the complex side effect profiles will be reviewed.

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11:00 am – Noon Friday, September 14

Improving Access to Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Clinical Trials for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (214)

1CNE  Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common inherited hemoglobin disorder in the U.S., affects nearly 100,000 people. Yet progress for advancing curative treatments such as hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been limited in part due to the shortage of clinical trial (CT) participation by individuals most affected. How to improve clinical trial participation for patients is the $1 million dollar question for many healthcare providers. Participants attending this session will be able to identify evidence-based strategies to enhance patients’ trust and increase HCT CT participation.

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11:00 am – Noon Friday, September 14

Starvation, Death, and Destruction: The Battlefield of AVN (213)

1CNE  Avascular necrosis (AVN) results from the temporary or permanent loss of blood supply to the bone and can lead to bone destruction, pain, and loss of joint function. Most hematology/oncology nurses are aware that corticosteroid exposure and older age are risk factors for the development of AVN in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Are you familiar with other risk factors in children with oncologic disorders? Did you know that AVN of the femoral head is a common complication in children with sickle cell disease? While nonsurgical approaches may be appropriate in the early stages, surgical management is often required for more progressive disease. Through the use of interactive case studies we’ll review the common presenting signs and symptoms of AVN in children with both hematological and oncologic disorders, diagnostic workup and disease staging, and evidence-based management strategies.

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