Paper Presentation: Engaging Patients and Providers in the Research Process — Engaging Children and Healthcare Providers in the Co-Design of a Mobile, Technology-Based Symptom Assessment App (210-1)

4:45 – 5:05 pm Thursday, September 13

1CNE Basis of inquiry: Mobile technology supports child-centric approaches to symptom reporting by incorporating game-based features to support children in reporting symptoms.

Purpose/Objectives: We describe the development of a child-centric symptom assessment app using school-age children (6–12 years) receiving treatment for cancer and pediatric oncology healthcare providers as co-designers. 

Methods: This project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 was an exploratory phase followed by programming during Phase 2. Phase 1 participants were 27 children (14 males; median 9 years) receiving treatment for cancer and 22 healthcare providers (21 female; 15 nurses; median 30–34 years). During Phase I, children participated in “draw and tell” interviews, and providers participated in focus groups. Data were then shared with the programming team to create an app prototype. Phase 2 participants were 29 children (20 male; median 10 years) and 18 healthcare providers (16 female; 10 nurses; median 30–34 years). Children and healthcare providers interacted with prototypes of the app as part of its preliminary usability evaluation and to provide additional input into the app’s content and features. Data were shared with the programming team to support iterative refinements to the app.

Findings or Outcomes: Phase 1: Both children and healthcare providers identified nausea, fatigue, pain, and sadness as most frequently occurring symptoms. Providers reported primarily relying on observation to assess symptoms and also expressed a desire to understand specific characteristics of symptoms to guide interventions. Both children and healthcare providers emphasized the capacity for personalization and creativity within the app. Phase 2: Children and providers interacted with the app prototype offered suggestions that supported iterative refinements of the app. Collectively, Phase 1 and 2 data guided the creation of “Color Me Healthy,” a personalized, game-based app that supports children in daily symptom reporting. A feasibility and acceptability trial is forthcoming.

Disclaimer: [1 CH] will be awarded for attending all three paper presentations presented during this timeslot. Partial credit is not available.

Basis of inquiry: Mobile technology supports child-centric approaches to symptom reporting by incorporating game-based features to support children in reporting symptoms.

Purpose/Objectives: We describe the development of a child-centric symptom assessment app using school-age children (6–12 years) receiving treatment for cancer and pediatric oncology healthcare providers as co-designers.

Methods: This project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 was an exploratory phase followed by programming during Phase 2. Phase 1 participants were 27 children (14 males; median 9 years) receiving treatment for cancer and 22 healthcare providers (21 female; 15 nurses; median 30–34 years). During Phase I, children participated in “draw and tell” interviews, and providers participated in focus groups. Data were then shared with the programming team to create an app prototype. Phase 2 participants were 29 children (20 male; median 10 years) and 18 healthcare providers (16 female; 10 nurses; median 30–34 years). Children and healthcare providers interacted with prototypes of the app as part of its preliminary usability evaluation and to provide additional input into the app’s content and features. Data were shared with the programming team to support iterative refinements to the app.

Findings or Outcomes: Phase 1: Both children and healthcare providers identified nausea, fatigue, pain, and sadness as most frequently occurring symptoms. Providers reported primarily relying on observation to assess symptoms and also expressed a desire to understand specific characteristics of symptoms to guide interventions. Both children and healthcare providers emphasized the capacity for personalization and creativity within the app. Phase 2: Children and providers interacted with the app prototype offered suggestions that supported iterative refinements of the app. Collectively, Phase 1 and 2 data guided the creation of “Color Me Healthy,” a personalized, game-based app that supports children in daily symptom reporting. A feasibility and acceptability trial is forthcoming.