Concurrent Sessions

3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Beyond the Cure: The Children’s Oncology Group’s Efforts to Improve Outcomes for Pediatric Cancer Patients Long after Treatment has Finished (C223)

coglogo1CNE  Childhood cancer survivors are living longer than ever before, with overall survival rates exceeding 80%. As a result, survivors also are living with chronic late health effects related to their curative treatments, with 40% of survivors experiencing a severe, disabling, and life-threatening or fatal late effect at 30 years post-treatment. Late effects may include second malignancies, endocrinopathies, cardiomyopathy, infertility, pulmonary function deficits, renal/ocular/auditory disorders, neurocognitive deficits, and metabolic syndrome. Recent studies report that cumulative incidence of late effects may be even higher than previously reported, with survivors having 3 to 5 treatment-related chronic health conditions by the age of 50.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Impact of Donor Selection in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Outcomes (224)

1CNE Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is an important therapeutic option for children with malignant and nonmalignant disease. Over the past 50 years, there has been an increasing number of indications for HSCT. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched related donors offer the best outcome and frequently donors are siblings that are children. Haploidentical and unrelated donors have expanded the pool of donors. Improved HLA typing and posttransplant supportive care has improved the outcome of HSCT from alternative donors. The American Academy of Pediatrics published a statement regarding pediatric patients undergoing HSCT. The policy recommended new standards that had significant impact on both pediatric stem cell transplant physicians and parents. Choosing the appropriate donor depends on the patient and donor’s degree of HLA matching, sex, parity, blood type, CMV status, HLA directed antibodies, and the health of the donor.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Connecting Fun with Purpose: Interactive Teaching Strategies to Improve Bedside Care (225)

1CNE  The complex field of pediatric hematology/oncology truly demands clinical expertise of the bedside nurse to safely care for patients. Nurse educators are challenged more than ever to provide education in the classroom that will translate to meaningful application at the bedside (Curran, 2014). Current literature promotes learner preparation prior to class coupled with in-class interactive learning to apply and solidify knowledge (Galway, Corbett, Takaro, Tairyan, & Frank, 2014; Vujovic, 2016).

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Comprehensive Care for Thalassemia (226)

1CNE  Thalassemia is becoming a more common diagnosis seen in pediatric hematology/oncology centers. The term thalassemia describes a group of very complex diseases that requires thorough, comprehensive care to improve outcomes and quality of life for these patients. A complicating factor is that patients often are immigrants or refugees with language and cultural barriers and other socioeconomic issues. The care of these patients require a multidisciplinary approach and a strong understanding of the pathophysiology, specific complications, current treatments, and new and emerging therapies.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Therapeutic & Prognostic Impact of Medulloblastoma Molecular Subgroups (227)

1CNE  Medulloblastoma is an embryonal tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). It is the most common malignant CNS tumor in children with peak incidence between 5–9 years of age. Patients typically present with cerebellar deficits and headaches with vomiting, specifically in the mornings. Prognosis varies according to multiple factors including histology, age at diagnosis, and metastases. Medulloblastoma treatment is an intense, multi-modality therapy that can have many resulting late effects. Recent findings have shown medulloblastoma to be a heterogeneous disease which includes multiple subgroups.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

COG Clinical Trials: Empowered Nurses the Key to their Success (C229)

coglogo1CNE  In pediatric oncology, clinical trials are conducted to improve survival rates, understand disease biology, and prevent or improve management of treatment-related acute and long-term side effects. The majority of children newly diagnosed with cancer in North America are treated on Children’s Oncology Group (COG) clinical trials. In the last 50 years clinical trials in pediatric oncology have increased the overall 5-year survival rate from under 10% to over 80% today. Nurses are an integral part of the success of these trials.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

DSRCT: A Pediatric Oncology Rarity (230)

1CNE  Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is one of the rarest pediatric tumors and was only recently classified in 1989. Categorized under sarcomas, DSRCT under the microscopic is a fusion of a both a wilms and ewing sarcoma gene. Although known as a mostly surgical tumor, chemotherapy, radiation, and new treatments like immunotherapy are vital in the battle against this fatal disease. DSRCT is known mostly in the adolescent and young adult population, where the rate of occurrence is predominantly in males. In a retrospective cohort analysis published in 2014 from the Journal of Cancer Epidemiology, the 5-year survival rate was found to be just 33.3% (Lettieri, Garcia-Filion, Hingorani, 2014). Factors impacting survival rate are the overall oncology role to treatment and management.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Transfusions in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients: As Easy As ABO (231)

1CNE  Transfusion of blood products is an essential part of caring for children with benign hematologic disorders, malignant diseases, and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One challenge in pediatric patients is the broad age range for patients that span from neonates to young adults. Recent studies have shown that there is a wide variability in practice among pediatric programs in the indications for transfusions, CMV prevention, and management of patients who become refractory to transfusions.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

They Just Don’t Get It! Unconscious Bias in Caring for Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders (232)

1CNE  Caring for a child with serious illness, especially when cure is uncertain, may be one of the most difficult and yet most rewarding experiences for all members of the healthcare team. This presentation examines how unconscious bias, or our personal “blind spot”, from the perspectives of the hematology/oncology team, family members, and palliative care team interferes with the ability of the to accept and integrate palliative care for children with high-risk and advanced hematologic or oncologic diagnoses.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

1CNE  The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g. inpatient v. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g. language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

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