7:15 – 8:15 pm Thursday, September 15

Professional Development Session: Professional Development GPS: The Long and Winding Road from Route 1 to Route 101 (CDE)

What does professional development mean for you? Do you want to get involved in your institution or APHON but are unsure how to start? Are you thinking about going back to school but are not certain what options best suit your needs? Interested in speaking to other APHON members to "pick their brains" about issues or questions you have in your own practice? Want to spend some time with some super nice people and have some SNACKS? This is the session for you! Read more...
Speaker:

Debbie Lafond, DNP CHPPN PPCNP-PC CPON®

Angie Blackwell, MSN RN CNS CPON®

Meredith Foxx, MSN RN PCNS-BC CPON®

Cecelia Gladbach, BSN RN BMTCN® CPON®

Terri L. Boyce, DNP APRN CPNP-AC CPHON®  

Teresa M. Conte, PhD MSN CRNP

Allison McNeil, BSN CPHON®

Kathy Perko, MS CHPPN CPNP CPON®

Breanne Roche, DNP RN CPNP-PC CPHON®

Melody A Watral, MSN RN CPNP CPNP-PC

CNE Hours
1
9:45 – 10:45 am Thursday, September 15

Using Your Resources-The Role Of A Clinical Resource Nurse (208-2)

Patient census and acuity throughout healthcare institutions continue to rise as staffing numbers and resources remain the same. Nursing is asked to create innovative ways to maximize staff productivity and efficiency, decrease burnout and increase retention while improving patient care. The development of a Clinical Resource Nurse (CRN) is an innovative approach to maximize the nurse's clinical potential and improve unit efficiency while working within the context of the current staffing model.

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4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Can Symptom Scores And Symptom Profiles Be More Clinically Useful? (219)

Symptom science has rapidly evolved over the past two decades, with progression from symptom measurement to sophisticated approaches to analyzing symptom data to illuminate symptom patterns. Cluster and person-specific approaches have been used in pediatric oncology research, but discussion of the clinical value of data generated from these approaches is lacking. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

We're Done! Now What? Determining End of Treatment Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and their Parents (201)

As the number of child cancer survivors (CCS) increases, so has the recognition of the unique needs of this group throughout the cancer-survivorship continuum. The end of cancer treatment (EOT) is a critical timepoint on this continuum. Family support and education needs at EOT are estimated to be at a similar level to what they were at diagnosis. Indeed, CCS and their parents report feeling unprepared for the physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges inherent in recovering from treatment and reintegrating back into school, work, and family life. Read more...
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Toward a Cure for Sickle Cell Disease: Exploring Gene Therapy (210)

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited blood disorder worldwide. It is estimated that 300,000 babies are born with SCD every year and it occurs largely in descendants of Sub Saharan Africa. SCD is caused by a specific mutation in the beta globin gene that results in sickle hemoglobin production. Sickle hemoglobin polymerization leads to red blood cell sickling, chronic hemolysis and vaso - occlusion. Patients with SCD experience significant pain crisis and end organ damage that leads to a decreased lifespan with a median life expectancy in the United States of 43 years. At this time, the only known cure for SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) most often with matched sibling donors. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Grow Your Professional Skills: Become a Peer Reviewer for a Journal (202)

Serving as a peer reviewer for a journal is an opportunity to serve your professional specialty, advance your knowledge and skills as a writer, and experience professional growth. Additionally, serving as a journal reviewer is recognized in performance reviews and can contribute to professional advancement on a clinical ladder. Peer reviewing is rewarding as you guide authors to improve their manuscripts and contribute to steering nursing science and practice.

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3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

CBD, THC, GVH, MMJ: Practical Ways to Make Sense of the Alphabet Soup (203)

Many pediatric oncology patients report medical marijuana (MMJ) and hemp-based CBD use. Hemp is now federally legal under the Farm Bill since December 2018 and hemp-based cannabinoid products are widely available. Research focused on cannabis and its’ use in oncology, hematology, and bone marrow transplant is continuing to grow. A study in Israel looks at adding cannabis to the treatment of graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplant. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Building a Sickle Cell Nurse Champions Program to improve patient care and nursing performance (200)

The social upheaval throughout the country during the summer of 2020 raised international awareness about the inequities people of color face throughout their lives. Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are a particular group that experiences healthcare disparities. The Sickle Cell Nurse Champion Program was created as a novel educational program to improve patient care and nursing performance. To build this program, we conducted a needs assessment from our patients and parents. Read more...
10:30 am – 11:30 am Saturday, September 17

Using Shared Experience to Define Optimal Care for Patients Receiving Blinatumomab on COG Clinical Trials (C228)

Targeted therapies that leverage and harness the immune system to treat malignancies have become one of the most rapidly growing treatment approaches in pediatric oncology. Blinatumomab, an immunotherapy, is one such approach which has generated significant momentum in the treatment of pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) (1). In the relapsed space Blinatumomab has demonstrated improved survival and decreased rates of significant toxicity, compared to standard chemotherapy. Read more...
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