2:55 pm –3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Primary Caregivers’ Knowledge Attitudes and Beliefs toward Palliative Care for Children with Cancer (235-3)

Parents of children with cancer perform a myriad of caregiving tasks related to Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC) along the illness trajectory. Yet, their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) toward PPC remain underexplored, especially in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) where care relies heavily on the family. A better understanding of parent KAB would inform effective strategies to support the integration of PPC into the care of children with cancer and their families.

The purpose of this two-phase multicenter study among primary caregivers of children with cancer in Lebanon was to examine their KAB toward PPC in order to uncover areas for improvement, to determine factors associated with KAB, and identify primary caregivers’ PPC tasks in caring for their children with cancer.

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9:45 am – 10:15 am Friday, September 16

Insurance and Neighborhood Opportunity Predict Adverse Events in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (217-1)

Our prior research uncovered potential socioeconomic (SE) risk factors for two adverse events that impact children hospitalized with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): hyperglycemia and severe sepsis. That research, however, was limited to only two measures of SE status, insurance source and median neighborhood income. Composite indices of neighborhood social and economic stability are useful in gleaning understanding of pathways between a child’s immediate environment and health outcomes. Yet, there is little reporting of the best way to measure these aspects of a child’s environment in pediatric oncology nursing research.

This study was a side-by-side comparison of three measures of SE status: insurance source, area deprivation and neighborhood child opportunity. The study goal was to determine each one’s utility as risk a predictor of hyperglycemia and serious infections, two outcomes our team has shown are potentially influenced by SE factors.

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5:20 pm – 5:40 pm Thursday, September 15

Preschool-Aged Child Self-Reported Cancer Communication Preferences (211-2)

Psychosocial care standards recommend that children and adolescents are engaged in their childhood cancer treatment according to their developmental abilities (Weiner et al, 2015). The study of child and adolescent cancer treatment communication has focused on school-age and adolescent children, but very few studies address preschool-aged child cancer communication. Identifying how preschoolers talk about their communication preferences could provide greater understanding of their self-reported needs. Read more...
4:25 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Examining Existential Distress in Adolescents with Advanced Cancer (205-3)

The life-threatening nature of advanced cancer has many psychosocial effects on both the patient and the family. Adolescents are mature enough to understand death and to have developed life goals, yet are also experiencing a period of distinct developmental challenges and psychosocial dynamics. As a result, existential distress may be highly significant and uniquely experienced by adolescents with advanced cancer. Existential distress and its impact on symptom management, suffering, and other patient outcomes have not been well-studied in adolescents with cancer.

This purpose of this paper is to analyze the concept of existential distress, highlighting and raising awareness of how existential distress may impact adolescents with advanced cancer and their families

 

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4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

We're Done! Now What? Determining End of Treatment Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and their Parents (201)

As the number of child cancer survivors (CCS) increases, so has the recognition of the unique needs of this group throughout the cancer-survivorship continuum. The end of cancer treatment (EOT) is a critical timepoint on this continuum. Family support and education needs at EOT are estimated to be at a similar level to what they were at diagnosis. Indeed, CCS and their parents report feeling unprepared for the physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges inherent in recovering from treatment and reintegrating back into school, work, and family life. Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

The Role of the Pediatric Clinical Research Nurse in the Management of Severe Aplastic Anemia (208-1)

Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a serious and life-threatening condition with an unknown etiology, involving improper production of stem cells due to damaged bone marrow. Without functional stem cells, the body is depleted of red blood cells, white blood cells, and/or platelets. With only 600 to 900 cases diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone, SAA is rare. Most patients are only provided supportive care measures: receiving blood transfusions to manage symptoms and adhere to complex medication regimens to limit complications; however, advancements in treatment of SAA are made possible through clinical research trials. The Clinical Research Nurse (CRN) must address the clinical needs of the research patient, but also be sensitive to the psychosocial and ethical issues of supporting pediatric research patients. This case study presents a 7-year old Mongolian patient, “M.B.”, with refractory SAA, who failed standard immunosuppressive therapy and failed to engraft from a previous expanded umbilical cord stem cell transplant. M.B. was enrolled in a clinical research protocol in which he underwent a haplo-identical transplantation using peripheral blood stem cells and post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis using Cyclophosphamide. M.B.’s complex clinical trajectory will unfold over the course of the case study, with the role of the Clinical Research Nurse highlighted. In addition to clinical complications, the COVID-19 pandemic added an additional layer of psychosocial and ethical complexities for M.B. and his family to navigate. Application of the Clinical Research Nurse Domain of Practice ensures that the bedside nurse addresses the holistic needs of the research patient and caregiver at the bedside, while also maintaining the integrity of the research protocol. Read more...
Speaker:
Alejandra Castillo MSN RN
CNE Hours
.50
9:45 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Using Their Own Words: AYA Cancer Patients as Influencers in COG Clinical Trials (C216)

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients continue to be a conundrum for providers, researchers, and health care systems. Previous challenges for AYA oncology care have been identified as delayed diagnosis, lack of insurance, limited clinical trial availability and enrollment, tumor biology, unique toxicity profiles, distinct psychosocial issues, and more. While there has been advancement in the treatment of AYAs with cancer, there is a paucity of information about how that treatment impacts the AYA cancer patient’s life, both during treatment and beyond. Read more...

Safe Zone Training (006)

Healthcare professionals are now interacting with more members of the LGBTQ+ community in their practices. How comfortable are you with engaging your patients and their families in conversations regarding sexuality and gender? Do you know and understand the current words and definitions used by the LGTBQ+ community? Do you understand what an ally is?  Can you describe the differences between diversity and inclusion? During this session, Teresa will lead discussions on these topics and help engage in activities that will allow you to reflect on your own knowledge and thoughts around your LGBTQ+ patients and families. At the end of this session, you will be “Safe Zone” trained. Teresa will also explore how you can bring about change in your institution to increase inclusion and provide better patient and family experiences. Read more...
Speaker:
Teresa Conte, PhD CPNP
Fee
$110 for Members
$140 for Non-Members
CNE Hours
3.75
2:30 – 3:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Opening Keynote: Embracing "AND" to Build Resilience: 3 Powerful AND Practical Strategies For Life (101)

Kim Regis is a retired Super Hero. A stroke stopped her life and taught her how to live a full authentic and integrated life. She went from living with a filled and fragmented schedule to strategizing how to put her experience in nursing, operations, and executive leadership to work for the greater good.

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Speaker:
Kim Regis, DNP RN NEA PNP BCC
CNE Hours
1
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