2:45 pm – 3:05 pm Saturday, September 17

Association of Health Literacy with Comprehension of Key New Diagnosis Education Concepts in Parents/Caregivers of Children with Cancer (235-2)

Parents/caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer are expected to adequately care for their child at home upon hospital discharge, which entails understanding how to manage medication schedules, recognize key signs and symptoms, and access care emergently (Landier et al., 2016). Read more...
9:45 am – 10:15 am Friday, September 16

Insurance and Neighborhood Opportunity Predict Adverse Events in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (217-1)

Our prior research uncovered potential socioeconomic (SE) risk factors for two adverse events that impact children hospitalized with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): hyperglycemia and severe sepsis. That research, however, was limited to only two measures of SE status, insurance source and median neighborhood income. Composite indices of neighborhood social and economic stability are useful in gleaning understanding of pathways between a child’s immediate environment and health outcomes. Yet, there is little reporting of the best way to measure these aspects of a child’s environment in pediatric oncology nursing research.

This study was a side-by-side comparison of three measures of SE status: insurance source, area deprivation and neighborhood child opportunity. The study goal was to determine each one’s utility as risk a predictor of hyperglycemia and serious infections, two outcomes our team has shown are potentially influenced by SE factors.

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4:15 pm – 4:35 pm Friday, September 16

Decreasing Ambulatory CLABSIs in Oncology Patients (223-1)

Ambulatory CLABSIs occurring in the pediatric oncology patient population result in increased hospitalizations, additional medications, potential for line removal, delayed treatment, decreased pt. satisfaction, and potentially worse pt. outcomes. While much attention has been given to hospital acquired infections, less focus has been given to community occurring infections. This session will describe a quality improvement project performed with the aim of decreasing the rate of ambulatory CLABSIs.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will be able to discuss the problem of ambulatory CLABSIs in the oncology population
  • The learner will identify potential cause and effect of ambulatory CLABSIs
  • The learner will be able to describe quality improvement initiatives designed to decrease incidence of ambulatory CLABSIs
Read more...
Speaker:
Angie Blackwell MSN RN ACCNS-P CPON®
CNE Hours
.33
5:00 pm - 5:20 pm Thursday, September 15

Symptom Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Management Behaviors Reported by Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer (211-1)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience co-occurring symptoms both during treatment and into survivorship. Most AYAs are healthy prior to diagnosis and need to learn self-management strategies for their cancer-related symptoms. Self-efficacy is requisite for AYAs to engage successfully in symptom self-management behaviors. Improving AYAs’ self-efficacy for managing symptoms and their use of effective symptom self-management behaviors can promote better outcomes for AYAs along the cancer care continuum.

The specific objectives were to describe the self-reported symptoms, self-efficacy for managing symptoms, and symptom self-management behaviors in a cross-sectional sample of AYAs with cancer.

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5:20 pm – 5:40 pm Thursday, September 15

Preschool-Aged Child Self-Reported Cancer Communication Preferences (211-2)

Psychosocial care standards recommend that children and adolescents are engaged in their childhood cancer treatment according to their developmental abilities (Weiner et al, 2015). The study of child and adolescent cancer treatment communication has focused on school-age and adolescent children, but very few studies address preschool-aged child cancer communication. Identifying how preschoolers talk about their communication preferences could provide greater understanding of their self-reported needs. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:05 pm Thursday, September 15

Approaches to Facilitate Patient-Reported Outcome Symptom Assessments in Children and Adolescents with Cancer (205-1)

Children and adolescents with cancer suffer with symptoms related to their diagnosis and to cancer-directed therapies; symptoms that are frequently poorly recognized and may be under-treated by clinicians. When symptoms persist or become severe, they can lead to dose-reductions and even premature discontinuation of cancer-directed therapies, which, in turn, can negatively affect treatment efficacy and survivorship. The first step to improving symptom management is to develop a better method for assessing and tracking symptoms. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Can Symptom Scores And Symptom Profiles Be More Clinically Useful? (219)

Symptom science has rapidly evolved over the past two decades, with progression from symptom measurement to sophisticated approaches to analyzing symptom data to illuminate symptom patterns. Cluster and person-specific approaches have been used in pediatric oncology research, but discussion of the clinical value of data generated from these approaches is lacking. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

We're Done! Now What? Determining End of Treatment Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and their Parents (201)

As the number of child cancer survivors (CCS) increases, so has the recognition of the unique needs of this group throughout the cancer-survivorship continuum. The end of cancer treatment (EOT) is a critical timepoint on this continuum. Family support and education needs at EOT are estimated to be at a similar level to what they were at diagnosis. Indeed, CCS and their parents report feeling unprepared for the physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges inherent in recovering from treatment and reintegrating back into school, work, and family life. Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Prior Authorization: Where was that in Nursing School? (207-1)

The world of healthcare has been dominated by discussion about COVID-19 over the past 2 years. At the same time, the field of pediatric hematology-oncology has continued to move forward with new therapies which offer hope for enhanced outcomes, specifically in the field of precision medicine. The topic that is not often recognized in those discussions is the growing complexity of payment for these therapies, as well as therapies that have been considered “standard” for many years. Nurses may be seeing increased requirement to participate in discussions about the cost or prior authorization of medications for their patients. In addition to these requirements, third party payors have growing expectations for prior authorization. At the same time, there are more third-party payor options on the market for families to choose, and unfortunately, some families are choosing plans that may not provide adequate coverage. The political climate has changed, as well, and the individual mandate for coverage, which was originally a part of the Affordable Care Act, was rescinded. New legislation has now created the No Surprises Act, which requires up-front estimate of the cost of care for specific situations. There was a time when care was scheduled as expected, and there was no need to worry about prior authorization, but in today’s world, nurses are likely hearing more and more about the status or need for “approval” of care in advance. This session will provide an overview of what pediatric hematology-oncology nurses may be experiencing as a part of daily operations in the care of these patients and families. An evolving model of multidisciplinary involvement to assure timely care in the face of growing third party payor expectations will be shared. Read more...
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Onco-Critical Care 101 (209-2)

Pediatric Oncology nurses are frequently exposed to patients with oncologic emergencies and who become critically ill requiring transfer to the PICU. They are familiar with conditions requiring transfer but happens to these patients while they are in the PICU? When the patient is transferred back to the regular oncology floor or presents back in clinic, it is helpful for the nurse to know what happened to their patient in the PICU. Common oncology critical care interventions such as CRRT, vasopressors, respiratory support, ect are largely unfamiliar to oncology nurses but can be helpful to understand for post PICU care and in situations where care must be initiated by the nurse on the floor. This presentation will cover the basics of Oncology Critical Care including recognizing oncologic emergencies that should trigger transfer to PICU and how these conditions are treated once the patient is in the PICU. Read more...
Speaker:
Katie Gardner MSN APRN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
.50
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