9:45 am – 10:15 am Friday, September 16

Insurance and Neighborhood Opportunity Predict Adverse Events in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (217-1)

Our prior research uncovered potential socioeconomic (SE) risk factors for two adverse events that impact children hospitalized with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL): hyperglycemia and severe sepsis. That research, however, was limited to only two measures of SE status, insurance source and median neighborhood income. Composite indices of neighborhood social and economic stability are useful in gleaning understanding of pathways between a child’s immediate environment and health outcomes. Yet, there is little reporting of the best way to measure these aspects of a child’s environment in pediatric oncology nursing research.

This study was a side-by-side comparison of three measures of SE status: insurance source, area deprivation and neighborhood child opportunity. The study goal was to determine each one’s utility as risk a predictor of hyperglycemia and serious infections, two outcomes our team has shown are potentially influenced by SE factors.

Read more...
10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

HSCT for MPS disorders (Hunters and Hurlers), (217-2)

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is best known as a treatment modality for hematologic malignancies, some solid tumors, and various autoimmune disorders. It is lesser known as a means to halt progressive symptoms in certain chromosomal inherited disorders such as Hunters and Hurlers disease. Patients with Hunters and Hurlers are born with an inherited x-linked chromosomal disease where sugar molecules are unable to be broken down and digested by the body causing both physical and mental disabilities. There is no cure for these diseases but HSCT is an intensive therapy that has shown promise with these diagnoses, helping to stop progression of symptoms of disease.

Two case studies of children who underwent HSCT at our center, one for Hunter’s and one for Hurler’s, will be presented from both a medical and psychosocial standpoint. How these children first presented, how HSCT affect their disease, the complications they underwent during their HSCT, and the complex psychosocial aspects of receiving chemotherapy as well as an extended hospitalization.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will describe the role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in the treatment of non-malignant diseases.
  • Identify conditioning regimens and their unique complications for non – malignant diseases.
  • The learner will describe the psychosocial needs of hematopoietic transplant patients and their families when they undergo a complex regiment such as HSCT.
Read more...
5:00 pm - 5:20 pm Thursday, September 15

Symptom Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Management Behaviors Reported by Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer (211-1)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience co-occurring symptoms both during treatment and into survivorship. Most AYAs are healthy prior to diagnosis and need to learn self-management strategies for their cancer-related symptoms. Self-efficacy is requisite for AYAs to engage successfully in symptom self-management behaviors. Improving AYAs’ self-efficacy for managing symptoms and their use of effective symptom self-management behaviors can promote better outcomes for AYAs along the cancer care continuum.

The specific objectives were to describe the self-reported symptoms, self-efficacy for managing symptoms, and symptom self-management behaviors in a cross-sectional sample of AYAs with cancer.

Read more...
5:20 pm – 5:40 pm Thursday, September 15

Preschool-Aged Child Self-Reported Cancer Communication Preferences (211-2)

Psychosocial care standards recommend that children and adolescents are engaged in their childhood cancer treatment according to their developmental abilities (Weiner et al, 2015). The study of child and adolescent cancer treatment communication has focused on school-age and adolescent children, but very few studies address preschool-aged child cancer communication. Identifying how preschoolers talk about their communication preferences could provide greater understanding of their self-reported needs. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:05 pm Thursday, September 15

Approaches to Facilitate Patient-Reported Outcome Symptom Assessments in Children and Adolescents with Cancer (205-1)

Children and adolescents with cancer suffer with symptoms related to their diagnosis and to cancer-directed therapies; symptoms that are frequently poorly recognized and may be under-treated by clinicians. When symptoms persist or become severe, they can lead to dose-reductions and even premature discontinuation of cancer-directed therapies, which, in turn, can negatively affect treatment efficacy and survivorship. The first step to improving symptom management is to develop a better method for assessing and tracking symptoms. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Grow Your Professional Skills: Become a Peer Reviewer for a Journal (202)

Serving as a peer reviewer for a journal is an opportunity to serve your professional specialty, advance your knowledge and skills as a writer, and experience professional growth. Additionally, serving as a journal reviewer is recognized in performance reviews and can contribute to professional advancement on a clinical ladder. Peer reviewing is rewarding as you guide authors to improve their manuscripts and contribute to steering nursing science and practice.

Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Neuro 911: Managing Neurologic Complications in Pediatric Oncology Patients (209-1)

Neurologic complications are common in pediatric patients with all types of malignancies. These complications can arise from the disease process itself or as a result of one of our therapies. Oncology nurses care for patients receiving multi-modal therapy with chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. It is important to recognize these complications quickly and correctly. Initiating treatment quickly may reduce pain, may prevent further progression and permanent deficits. Read more...
10:30 am – 11:30 am Saturday, September 17

Using Shared Experience to Define Optimal Care for Patients Receiving Blinatumomab on COG Clinical Trials (C228)

Targeted therapies that leverage and harness the immune system to treat malignancies have become one of the most rapidly growing treatment approaches in pediatric oncology. Blinatumomab, an immunotherapy, is one such approach which has generated significant momentum in the treatment of pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) (1). In the relapsed space Blinatumomab has demonstrated improved survival and decreased rates of significant toxicity, compared to standard chemotherapy. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Hot Topics in Pediatric Oncology: Updates from the Children’s Oncology Group (C222)

Despite the pandemic, the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) has produced 237 publications since the beginning of 2020. The magnitude of this productivity makes it difficult for health care professionals to remain up to date with new knowledge. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight results from four recent, COG publications and assist nurses in translating evidence into their practice.  Read more...
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Strategies in Survivorship Care: Addressing Current Long-term Follow-up Surveillance Gaps Through Individualized Survivorship Care Plans And Specialty Survivorship Clinics (234) 

With current 10-year survival rates greater than 80% for pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) cancer patients there exists and ever-increasing population of pediatric and AYA cancer survivors. Pediatric and AYA survivors who finish cancer-directed treatment are often burdened with significant risks for long-term complications. This includes risks of secondary cancers and accelerated development of usual age-related comorbid conditions such as heart failure, kidney disease and osteopenia. Given these risks, cancer survivors require specialized health care monitoring and surveillance. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study has identified significant, suboptimal adherence to COG screening guidelines for secondary malignancies (breast, colorectal, and skin) and cardiac disease amongst this high-risk population. Many survivors and their caregivers also report that they feel uninformed yet worried about potential late effects. This current gap emphasizes the importance of individualized survivorship care post cancer treatment, both short and long term.

Read more...
Speaker:
Stephanie Neerings MSN APRN FNP-BC
CNE Hours
1
Subscribe to this RSS feed