4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Can Symptom Scores And Symptom Profiles Be More Clinically Useful? (219)

Symptom science has rapidly evolved over the past two decades, with progression from symptom measurement to sophisticated approaches to analyzing symptom data to illuminate symptom patterns. Cluster and person-specific approaches have been used in pediatric oncology research, but discussion of the clinical value of data generated from these approaches is lacking. Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

The Role of the Pediatric Clinical Research Nurse in the Management of Severe Aplastic Anemia (208-1)

Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a serious and life-threatening condition with an unknown etiology, involving improper production of stem cells due to damaged bone marrow. Without functional stem cells, the body is depleted of red blood cells, white blood cells, and/or platelets. With only 600 to 900 cases diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone, SAA is rare. Most patients are only provided supportive care measures: receiving blood transfusions to manage symptoms and adhere to complex medication regimens to limit complications; however, advancements in treatment of SAA are made possible through clinical research trials. The Clinical Research Nurse (CRN) must address the clinical needs of the research patient, but also be sensitive to the psychosocial and ethical issues of supporting pediatric research patients. This case study presents a 7-year old Mongolian patient, “M.B.”, with refractory SAA, who failed standard immunosuppressive therapy and failed to engraft from a previous expanded umbilical cord stem cell transplant. M.B. was enrolled in a clinical research protocol in which he underwent a haplo-identical transplantation using peripheral blood stem cells and post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis using Cyclophosphamide. M.B.’s complex clinical trajectory will unfold over the course of the case study, with the role of the Clinical Research Nurse highlighted. In addition to clinical complications, the COVID-19 pandemic added an additional layer of psychosocial and ethical complexities for M.B. and his family to navigate. Application of the Clinical Research Nurse Domain of Practice ensures that the bedside nurse addresses the holistic needs of the research patient and caregiver at the bedside, while also maintaining the integrity of the research protocol. Read more...
Speaker:
Alejandra Castillo MSN RN
CNE Hours
.50
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

CBD, THC, GVH, MMJ: Practical Ways to Make Sense of the Alphabet Soup (203)

Many pediatric oncology patients report medical marijuana (MMJ) and hemp-based CBD use. Hemp is now federally legal under the Farm Bill since December 2018 and hemp-based cannabinoid products are widely available. Research focused on cannabis and its’ use in oncology, hematology, and bone marrow transplant is continuing to grow. A study in Israel looks at adding cannabis to the treatment of graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplant. Read more...
9:45 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Using Their Own Words: AYA Cancer Patients as Influencers in COG Clinical Trials (C216)

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients continue to be a conundrum for providers, researchers, and health care systems. Previous challenges for AYA oncology care have been identified as delayed diagnosis, lack of insurance, limited clinical trial availability and enrollment, tumor biology, unique toxicity profiles, distinct psychosocial issues, and more. While there has been advancement in the treatment of AYAs with cancer, there is a paucity of information about how that treatment impacts the AYA cancer patient’s life, both during treatment and beyond. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Targeting Patient and Family Education for ALK/MEK Inhibitor Therapy: What We Learned from the COG Nursing Evidenced Based Project (C204)

coglogoChildren with cancer have historically received multiple modalities of therapy to treat their disease processes including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplant. These modalities incur the potential for significant acute toxicity and late effects from therapy. In the last decade, the addition of a new modality known as biotherapy has become an integral player in the treatment of pediatric cancers. Biotherapy includes targeted therapies used to attack and destroy cancer cells while minimizing effects on healthy cells and tissue. Read more...
9:45 am – 10:15 am Friday, September 16

Sickle Cell Disease: When Abdominal Pain is Not Sickle Cell Pain (213-1)

A hallmark of sickle cell disease is pain. Abdominal pain can be a common complaint among children with and without sickle disease and may be related to a wide variety of underlying causes For children with and without sickle cell disease abdominal pain may be related to constipation, anxiety, an infectious process, an acute surgical concern or possibly a chronic medical condition. Abdominal pain in a child with sickle cell disease may be related to any of the previously mentioned causes but may also be related to splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, cholelithiasis, or a vaso-occlusive crises. Read more...
10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Sickle Cell Disease and Increased Hemolysis. When to Consider Evaluating for A Concurrent Hereditary Hemolytic Condition (213-2)

Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited red blood cell disorder that can lead to increased hemolysis which can result in significant anemia. When a child with sickle cell disease does not respond to therapies or interventions designed to decrease hemolysis, then a provider may want to consider the presence of a concurrent inherited hemolytic process such as G6PD, Hereditary Elliptocytosis or Gluthathione reductase deficiency. Read more...
9:45 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Photobiomodulation for Prevention and Treatment of Oral Mucositis: Part II (214)

Oral mucositis is a significant and common toxicity experienced by patients who receive high-dose chemotherapy as a preparatory regimen for a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Photobiomodulation has been found to be feasible with significant efficacy in preventing the progression of oral mucositis in patients undergoing HCT. Read more...
9:45 am – 10:50 am Friday, September 16

Neurofibromatosis Therapeutics Program: Program Development, Tumor Treatment, and Side Effect Management (215)

The advanced practice provider is instrumental in designing, developing, and growing a program to treat tumors associated with Neurofibromatosis (NF) Type 1 and 2. Both NF1 and NF2 are autosomal dominant genetic disorders associated with the growth of both benign and malignant tumors of the peripheral and central nervous system. In the last two years selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, gained FDA approval for treatment of plexiform neurofibromas in the children with NF. Read more...
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