10:50 am – 11:10 am Saturday, September 17

Understanding the Current State of Pediatric Oncology Nursing Quality Measurement in Free-Standing Children’s Hospitals Across the United States (229-2)

The impact of nursing care on patient outcomes has been demonstrated in adult and pediatric settings but limited attention has been given to standardized measurement of pediatric oncology nursing care.

With advances in pediatric cancer therapy, patients may be offered multiple treatment modalities which require intensive nursing support. To provide high quality care for these complex patients with evolving needs, pediatric oncology nurses require specialized skills, knowledge and appropriate resources. Given the gap in current literature addressing the impact of nurse sensitive measures that impact the quality of nursing care across the pediatric oncology continuum, the first step was to identify these potential measures. The ability to identify key performance measures and to articulate their value in the delivery of nursing care is central to improving the quality of the patient/family/employee experience in this highly complex and specialized environment. Using process measures allows for greater understanding of the extent to which clinical care is following best practice.

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Speaker:
Pamela Dockx BSN RN CPON®
CNE Hours
0.33
2:55 pm –3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Primary Caregivers’ Knowledge Attitudes and Beliefs toward Palliative Care for Children with Cancer (235-3)

Parents of children with cancer perform a myriad of caregiving tasks related to Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC) along the illness trajectory. Yet, their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) toward PPC remain underexplored, especially in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) where care relies heavily on the family. A better understanding of parent KAB would inform effective strategies to support the integration of PPC into the care of children with cancer and their families.

The purpose of this two-phase multicenter study among primary caregivers of children with cancer in Lebanon was to examine their KAB toward PPC in order to uncover areas for improvement, to determine factors associated with KAB, and identify primary caregivers’ PPC tasks in caring for their children with cancer.

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11:10 am – 11:30 am Saturday, September 17

Improving the Efficiency and Efficacy for Patients in Sickle Cell Crisis in the Outpatient Setting (229-3)

The unpredictability of sickle cell crisis leads to same-day add-on visits where the patient is reliant on the provider of the day. Due to the lack of consistent providers, the interpretation of the patient’s pain can be influenced by a lack of understanding on how to properly manage it based on previous encounters. Read more...
9:45 – 10:45 am Thursday, September 15

Using Your Resources-The Role Of A Clinical Resource Nurse (208-2)

Patient census and acuity throughout healthcare institutions continue to rise as staffing numbers and resources remain the same. Nursing is asked to create innovative ways to maximize staff productivity and efficiency, decrease burnout and increase retention while improving patient care. The development of a Clinical Resource Nurse (CRN) is an innovative approach to maximize the nurse's clinical potential and improve unit efficiency while working within the context of the current staffing model.

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2:15 pm – 2:35 pm Saturday, September 17

Do Parents Protect Themselves When Administering Home Oral Chemotherapy to Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia? (235-1)

As part of cancer treatment, parents of children with cancer are expected to administer multiple medications to their child in the home setting (Landier et al., 2016). Safe practices in delivering oral chemotherapy are an essential part of the education of parents of children with cancer (Rodgers et al., 2018). Little is known about what parents actually do in the home setting to protect themselves from exposure when administering oral chemotherapy.

 

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6:45 – 8:00 am
Saturday, September 17
CNE Presentation

Recognition Breakfast for Certified Oncology Nurses: Lighten Up and Laugh . . . .Learn to Take Yourself Lightly, For the Health of It! (RB)

Oncology Nursing is no laughing matter! But a positive work culture makes all the difference. Laughter raises client-centered focus, motivation, staff engagement, and, yes, even productivity while addressing compassion fatigue, staff satisfaction, and greater joy! A good “sense of humor” spills over into heart-centered patient care.


Craig’s keynote is guaranteed to shake loose some old paradigms, stimulate the ol’ funny bones, and leave participants with a true experience of “taking your work seriously while taking yourself lightly.”

*Please note that while this optional event is included in the conference fee, selecting the event on the registration form is required to attend. Space is limited to the first 300 certified hematology/oncology/BMT nurses who register.

ONCC homepage
APHON thanks ONCC for their generous support of this event. 
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Speaker:
Craig Zablocki
CNE Hours
1.25

Abstracts, Posters, Presentations, and More! (004)

The APHON Conference Planning Committee is excited to offer this FREE (for members) workshop to attendees looking for education about abstracts and professional presentations.

This workshop will offer didactic education about writing abstract reviewers can’t pass up, developing an award-winning poster presentation, and strategies for successful oral presentations. Attendees will also have the opportunity to learn from an expert in the field, sharing tips and tricks from the reviewer's perspective.
Small group breakouts will be mentored/facilitated by Conference Planning Committee members to help attendees develop their project ideas into a future submission to a professional organization.

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2:45 pm – 3:05 pm Saturday, September 17

Association of Health Literacy with Comprehension of Key New Diagnosis Education Concepts in Parents/Caregivers of Children with Cancer (235-2)

Parents/caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer are expected to adequately care for their child at home upon hospital discharge, which entails understanding how to manage medication schedules, recognize key signs and symptoms, and access care emergently (Landier et al., 2016). Read more...
10:30 am – 10:50 am Saturday, September 17

A Collaborative Approach to the Development of Specialized Nursing Education in a Lower Middle-Income Country (Ghana) (229-1)

Children with cancer in low- and middle-income countries are four times more likely to die of the disease than those in high income countries. Expert nurses are critical to a successful pediatric oncology program, yet few opportunities exist for nurses across Ghana to receive specialized education. Read more...
4:55 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Wearing Two Hats: Professional Boundaries When Balancing Direct Care and Research Roles (223-3)

Nursing care, whether in the clinical or research context, is guided and directed by the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses. The Code of Ethics is based on the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice. These principles can serve to guide nurses as they navigate what may seem to be competing roles of direct-care nurse and nurse intervenor. This presentation will describe: 1) role conflicts that may present when the nurse functions as both care provider and intervenor as part of a research study and 2) strategies for managing role conflict.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe role conflicts that may present when direct care nurses including advance practice nurses serve as intervenors in randomized clinical trials.
  • Identify key ethical principles that the nurse must always consider when providing care either in the clinical or research context.
  • Outline strategies to manage role conflicts that may present when direct care nurses serve as intervenors in randomized clinical trials.
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