10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

HSCT for MPS disorders (Hunters and Hurlers), (217-2)

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is best known as a treatment modality for hematologic malignancies, some solid tumors, and various autoimmune disorders. It is lesser known as a means to halt progressive symptoms in certain chromosomal inherited disorders such as Hunters and Hurlers disease. Patients with Hunters and Hurlers are born with an inherited x-linked chromosomal disease where sugar molecules are unable to be broken down and digested by the body causing both physical and mental disabilities. There is no cure for these diseases but HSCT is an intensive therapy that has shown promise with these diagnoses, helping to stop progression of symptoms of disease.

Two case studies of children who underwent HSCT at our center, one for Hunter’s and one for Hurler’s, will be presented from both a medical and psychosocial standpoint. How these children first presented, how HSCT affect their disease, the complications they underwent during their HSCT, and the complex psychosocial aspects of receiving chemotherapy as well as an extended hospitalization.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will describe the role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in the treatment of non-malignant diseases.
  • Identify conditioning regimens and their unique complications for non – malignant diseases.
  • The learner will describe the psychosocial needs of hematopoietic transplant patients and their families when they undergo a complex regiment such as HSCT.
Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Onco-Critical Care 101 (209-2)

Pediatric Oncology nurses are frequently exposed to patients with oncologic emergencies and who become critically ill requiring transfer to the PICU. They are familiar with conditions requiring transfer but happens to these patients while they are in the PICU? When the patient is transferred back to the regular oncology floor or presents back in clinic, it is helpful for the nurse to know what happened to their patient in the PICU. Common oncology critical care interventions such as CRRT, vasopressors, respiratory support, ect are largely unfamiliar to oncology nurses but can be helpful to understand for post PICU care and in situations where care must be initiated by the nurse on the floor. This presentation will cover the basics of Oncology Critical Care including recognizing oncologic emergencies that should trigger transfer to PICU and how these conditions are treated once the patient is in the PICU. Read more...
Speaker:
Katie Gardner MSN APRN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
.50
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Targeting Patient and Family Education for ALK/MEK Inhibitor Therapy: What We Learned from the COG Nursing Evidenced Based Project (C204)

coglogoChildren with cancer have historically received multiple modalities of therapy to treat their disease processes including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplant. These modalities incur the potential for significant acute toxicity and late effects from therapy. In the last decade, the addition of a new modality known as biotherapy has become an integral player in the treatment of pediatric cancers. Biotherapy includes targeted therapies used to attack and destroy cancer cells while minimizing effects on healthy cells and tissue. Read more...
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Renewed Hope for the Future: Menin Inhibitors for Relapsed/Refractory Leukemia (233)

Prognosis for pediatric patients and adolescents with multiple relapsed/refractory leukemia remains grim. Many have received relapsed protocols, CAR-T therapies, stem cell transplants and yet, the disease returns. In the past, the next discussion in this patient population would lead towards palliation and quality of life, with little hope for cure. Recent advancement in therapy for children with refractory leukemia has introduced the use of menin inhibitor in patients with KMT2A/MLL and NPM1 mutations, providing a number of young patients with another chance of remission and a chance at a cure. Read more...
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Saturday, September 17

Pediatric Anticoagulation: Who, What, When, Where, and Why (and a little How) (225) 

Pediatric anticoagulation can present challenges to the advanced practice nurse (as well as the ambulatory or bedside nurse) with limited experience in the broad scope of clinical scenarios where either prophylactic or treatment anticoagulation is recommended (it's not just clots). Traditionally, the only pharmacologic options utilized in children have been limited to heparin (including low molecular weight heparin) and warfarin. However, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now being incorporated in a limited fashion, dependent on both age of the child and clinical application. Read more...
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