9:45 – 10:45 am Thursday, September 15

Using Your Resources-The Role Of A Clinical Resource Nurse (208-2)

Patient census and acuity throughout healthcare institutions continue to rise as staffing numbers and resources remain the same. Nursing is asked to create innovative ways to maximize staff productivity and efficiency, decrease burnout and increase retention while improving patient care. The development of a Clinical Resource Nurse (CRN) is an innovative approach to maximize the nurse's clinical potential and improve unit efficiency while working within the context of the current staffing model.

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4:15 pm – 4:35 pm Friday, September 16

Decreasing Ambulatory CLABSIs in Oncology Patients (223-1)

Ambulatory CLABSIs occurring in the pediatric oncology patient population result in increased hospitalizations, additional medications, potential for line removal, delayed treatment, decreased pt. satisfaction, and potentially worse pt. outcomes. While much attention has been given to hospital acquired infections, less focus has been given to community occurring infections. This session will describe a quality improvement project performed with the aim of decreasing the rate of ambulatory CLABSIs.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will be able to discuss the problem of ambulatory CLABSIs in the oncology population
  • The learner will identify potential cause and effect of ambulatory CLABSIs
  • The learner will be able to describe quality improvement initiatives designed to decrease incidence of ambulatory CLABSIs
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Speaker:
Angie Blackwell MSN RN ACCNS-P CPON®
CNE Hours
.33
5:20 pm – 5:40 pm Thursday, September 15

Preschool-Aged Child Self-Reported Cancer Communication Preferences (211-2)

Psychosocial care standards recommend that children and adolescents are engaged in their childhood cancer treatment according to their developmental abilities (Weiner et al, 2015). The study of child and adolescent cancer treatment communication has focused on school-age and adolescent children, but very few studies address preschool-aged child cancer communication. Identifying how preschoolers talk about their communication preferences could provide greater understanding of their self-reported needs. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Prior Authorization: Where was that in Nursing School? (207-1)

The world of healthcare has been dominated by discussion about COVID-19 over the past 2 years. At the same time, the field of pediatric hematology-oncology has continued to move forward with new therapies which offer hope for enhanced outcomes, specifically in the field of precision medicine. The topic that is not often recognized in those discussions is the growing complexity of payment for these therapies, as well as therapies that have been considered “standard” for many years. Nurses may be seeing increased requirement to participate in discussions about the cost or prior authorization of medications for their patients. In addition to these requirements, third party payors have growing expectations for prior authorization. At the same time, there are more third-party payor options on the market for families to choose, and unfortunately, some families are choosing plans that may not provide adequate coverage. The political climate has changed, as well, and the individual mandate for coverage, which was originally a part of the Affordable Care Act, was rescinded. New legislation has now created the No Surprises Act, which requires up-front estimate of the cost of care for specific situations. There was a time when care was scheduled as expected, and there was no need to worry about prior authorization, but in today’s world, nurses are likely hearing more and more about the status or need for “approval” of care in advance. This session will provide an overview of what pediatric hematology-oncology nurses may be experiencing as a part of daily operations in the care of these patients and families. An evolving model of multidisciplinary involvement to assure timely care in the face of growing third party payor expectations will be shared. Read more...
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Onco-Critical Care 101 (209-2)

Pediatric Oncology nurses are frequently exposed to patients with oncologic emergencies and who become critically ill requiring transfer to the PICU. They are familiar with conditions requiring transfer but happens to these patients while they are in the PICU? When the patient is transferred back to the regular oncology floor or presents back in clinic, it is helpful for the nurse to know what happened to their patient in the PICU. Common oncology critical care interventions such as CRRT, vasopressors, respiratory support, ect are largely unfamiliar to oncology nurses but can be helpful to understand for post PICU care and in situations where care must be initiated by the nurse on the floor. This presentation will cover the basics of Oncology Critical Care including recognizing oncologic emergencies that should trigger transfer to PICU and how these conditions are treated once the patient is in the PICU. Read more...
Speaker:
Katie Gardner MSN APRN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
.50
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Compassionate Use, Expanded Access, and Patient Assistance ? Obtaining Life-Saving Medications When a Clinical Trial is Not Available (207-2)

The vast majority of clinical trials conducted in oncology are not open to patients under the age of 18 years old, leaving pediatric cancer patients with a very limited selection of FDA-approved therapies. Though clinical trials are the safest and most-beneficial means of determining the effectiveness of medications, not all patients have the option to enroll in clinical trials due to barriers such as patient clinical status, geographic location, or enrollment caps. In other circumstances where FDA-approved therapies are commercially available, insurance companies simply deny payment for off-label use of these expensive medications based on disease categories instead of oncogenic targets. Compassionate use programs, also known as expanded access trials or single patient investigational new drugs, provide opportunity for these patients to obtain possibly life-saving therapies. This interactive session will help demystify the process of gaining access to medical therapies on behalf of our patients. The different terms used in the compassionate use process will be discussed, as well as the specific steps oncology teams can take to apply to the FDA for approval of experimental medications. Case studies will provide examples of how the compassionate use process works in different circumstances as well as demonstrate clinical outcomes. Payment assistance programs and other resources to help patients pay for FDA-approved medications will also be covered. Read more...
Speaker:

Jason Morris MSN CPNP-PC CPHON®

Anne Raines, MSN, RN, CPHON

CNE Hours
.50
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

What the HEC is MEC? Understanding Antiemetic Therapy for Moderately and Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy (230)

Optimal chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) control has been shown to improve patient’s quality of life and decrease distress. Without good control, both physical and psychological complications can occur, including anorexia, malnutrition, and nutritional deficiency. But what is optimal CINV control? Nausea without vomiting? No nausea? No vomiting? Only vomiting a few times? This definition can mean something different to every patient, provider, and nurse. Read more...
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Saturday, September 17

The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: What We All Need to Know (224)

In 2021, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly known as the Institute of Medicine (IOM), released the report Future of Nursing (FON) 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. This most recent report is the third report on the future of nursing, initially created with the sponsorship of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) published in 2011 (National Academy of Sciences). Nurses at all levels need to be familiar with the needs of the profession and how they can get involved and make a difference for themselves and their patients. Read more...
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Strategies in Survivorship Care: Addressing Current Long-term Follow-up Surveillance Gaps Through Individualized Survivorship Care Plans And Specialty Survivorship Clinics (234) 

With current 10-year survival rates greater than 80% for pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) cancer patients there exists and ever-increasing population of pediatric and AYA cancer survivors. Pediatric and AYA survivors who finish cancer-directed treatment are often burdened with significant risks for long-term complications. This includes risks of secondary cancers and accelerated development of usual age-related comorbid conditions such as heart failure, kidney disease and osteopenia. Given these risks, cancer survivors require specialized health care monitoring and surveillance. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study has identified significant, suboptimal adherence to COG screening guidelines for secondary malignancies (breast, colorectal, and skin) and cardiac disease amongst this high-risk population. Many survivors and their caregivers also report that they feel uninformed yet worried about potential late effects. This current gap emphasizes the importance of individualized survivorship care post cancer treatment, both short and long term.

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Speaker:
Stephanie Neerings MSN APRN FNP-BC
CNE Hours
1
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