4:55 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Wearing Two Hats: Professional Boundaries When Balancing Direct Care and Research Roles (223-3)

Nursing care, whether in the clinical or research context, is guided and directed by the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses. The Code of Ethics is based on the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice. These principles can serve to guide nurses as they navigate what may seem to be competing roles of direct-care nurse and nurse intervenor. This presentation will describe: 1) role conflicts that may present when the nurse functions as both care provider and intervenor as part of a research study and 2) strategies for managing role conflict.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe role conflicts that may present when direct care nurses including advance practice nurses serve as intervenors in randomized clinical trials.
  • Identify key ethical principles that the nurse must always consider when providing care either in the clinical or research context.
  • Outline strategies to manage role conflicts that may present when direct care nurses serve as intervenors in randomized clinical trials.
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10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

HSCT for MPS disorders (Hunters and Hurlers), (217-2)

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is best known as a treatment modality for hematologic malignancies, some solid tumors, and various autoimmune disorders. It is lesser known as a means to halt progressive symptoms in certain chromosomal inherited disorders such as Hunters and Hurlers disease. Patients with Hunters and Hurlers are born with an inherited x-linked chromosomal disease where sugar molecules are unable to be broken down and digested by the body causing both physical and mental disabilities. There is no cure for these diseases but HSCT is an intensive therapy that has shown promise with these diagnoses, helping to stop progression of symptoms of disease.

Two case studies of children who underwent HSCT at our center, one for Hunter’s and one for Hurler’s, will be presented from both a medical and psychosocial standpoint. How these children first presented, how HSCT affect their disease, the complications they underwent during their HSCT, and the complex psychosocial aspects of receiving chemotherapy as well as an extended hospitalization.

Learning Objectives:

  • The learner will describe the role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in the treatment of non-malignant diseases.
  • Identify conditioning regimens and their unique complications for non – malignant diseases.
  • The learner will describe the psychosocial needs of hematopoietic transplant patients and their families when they undergo a complex regiment such as HSCT.
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3:45 pm – 4:05 pm Thursday, September 15

Approaches to Facilitate Patient-Reported Outcome Symptom Assessments in Children and Adolescents with Cancer (205-1)

Children and adolescents with cancer suffer with symptoms related to their diagnosis and to cancer-directed therapies; symptoms that are frequently poorly recognized and may be under-treated by clinicians. When symptoms persist or become severe, they can lead to dose-reductions and even premature discontinuation of cancer-directed therapies, which, in turn, can negatively affect treatment efficacy and survivorship. The first step to improving symptom management is to develop a better method for assessing and tracking symptoms. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

CBD, THC, GVH, MMJ: Practical Ways to Make Sense of the Alphabet Soup (203)

Many pediatric oncology patients report medical marijuana (MMJ) and hemp-based CBD use. Hemp is now federally legal under the Farm Bill since December 2018 and hemp-based cannabinoid products are widely available. Research focused on cannabis and its’ use in oncology, hematology, and bone marrow transplant is continuing to grow. A study in Israel looks at adding cannabis to the treatment of graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplant. Read more...

Safe Zone Training (006)

Healthcare professionals are now interacting with more members of the LGBTQ+ community in their practices. How comfortable are you with engaging your patients and their families in conversations regarding sexuality and gender? Do you know and understand the current words and definitions used by the LGTBQ+ community? Do you understand what an ally is?  Can you describe the differences between diversity and inclusion? During this session, Teresa will lead discussions on these topics and help engage in activities that will allow you to reflect on your own knowledge and thoughts around your LGBTQ+ patients and families. At the end of this session, you will be “Safe Zone” trained. Teresa will also explore how you can bring about change in your institution to increase inclusion and provide better patient and family experiences. Read more...
Speaker:
Teresa Conte, PhD CPNP
Fee
$110 for Members
$140 for Non-Members
CNE Hours
3.75
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Bench to Bedside: DNP and Nurse Researcher Collaboration (206)

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in nursing, while different in focus, in collaboration serve as integral, interrelated components in quality improvement, evidenced-based practice, research and dissemination. The strength in combining the research appraisal and investigation of PhD-prepared nurse and the DNP-prepared nurses’ clinical experience and skill offers opportunities to address gaps in patient care and bring the “bench to the bedside”.In pediatric hematology/oncology, both the DNP and PhD-prepared nurse are well positioned to be drivers of practice change and improvement. By recognizing each other’s strengths, this group of scholarly nurses can create a partnership to develop and implement evidenced-based care, impact the quality of care delivered and enhance the patient experience. In this session, attendees will follow along the presenter’s journey as they collaborate to develop their first clinical research study focused in childhood leukemia, and share their lessons learned, failures, mistakes to avoid and overall success. Read more...
2:30 – 3:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Opening Keynote: Embracing "AND" to Build Resilience: 3 Powerful AND Practical Strategies For Life (101)

Kim Regis is a retired Super Hero. A stroke stopped her life and taught her how to live a full authentic and integrated life. She went from living with a filled and fragmented schedule to strategizing how to put her experience in nursing, operations, and executive leadership to work for the greater good.

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Speaker:
Kim Regis, DNP RN NEA PNP BCC
CNE Hours
1
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

What the HEC is MEC? Understanding Antiemetic Therapy for Moderately and Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy (230)

Optimal chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) control has been shown to improve patient’s quality of life and decrease distress. Without good control, both physical and psychological complications can occur, including anorexia, malnutrition, and nutritional deficiency. But what is optimal CINV control? Nausea without vomiting? No nausea? No vomiting? Only vomiting a few times? This definition can mean something different to every patient, provider, and nurse. Read more...
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 17

Strategies in Survivorship Care: Addressing Current Long-term Follow-up Surveillance Gaps Through Individualized Survivorship Care Plans And Specialty Survivorship Clinics (234) 

With current 10-year survival rates greater than 80% for pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) cancer patients there exists and ever-increasing population of pediatric and AYA cancer survivors. Pediatric and AYA survivors who finish cancer-directed treatment are often burdened with significant risks for long-term complications. This includes risks of secondary cancers and accelerated development of usual age-related comorbid conditions such as heart failure, kidney disease and osteopenia. Given these risks, cancer survivors require specialized health care monitoring and surveillance. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study has identified significant, suboptimal adherence to COG screening guidelines for secondary malignancies (breast, colorectal, and skin) and cardiac disease amongst this high-risk population. Many survivors and their caregivers also report that they feel uninformed yet worried about potential late effects. This current gap emphasizes the importance of individualized survivorship care post cancer treatment, both short and long term.

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Speaker:
Stephanie Neerings MSN APRN FNP-BC
CNE Hours
1
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