12:15 – 12:35 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Outcomes of Serious Illness on Nurses, Patients, and Families—Keeping a Positive Outlook – Strategies, Threats, and Outcomes for Parents of Children with Cancer and Other Serious Illness (225-1)

Parents who make end-of-life decisions for their seriously ill children do so according to their individual definitions of ‘being a good parent’ to their seriously ill child. This pediatric cancer nursing concept, developed by Pamela Hinds, has been applied to parents of critically ill children but has potential relevance for other pediatric contexts.

Read more...
Speaker:
Katherine Kelly, PhD APRN PCNS-BC CPON®
CNE Hours
0.33
12:15 – 1:15 pm Thursday, September 3

Caring for Pediatric Patients with Malignant Bone Tumors: The Advanced Practice Nurse’s Perspective (213)

Children, adolescents, and young adults with malignant bone tumors require expert and specialized care beginning at diagnosis and continuing throughout therapy and beyond. Each patient’s treatment plan is likely to include systemic chemotherapy plus radiation and/or surgery to achieve local tumor control.

Read more...
Speaker:
Kristen Dalton, MSN RN CPNP-AC CPHON®
Elizabeth Cummings, MSN RN CPNP-AC CPHON®
Amy Rapino, MSN CRNP
CNE Hours
1
12:15 – 1:15 pm Thursday, September 3

Endocrinopathies Related to Cancer Therapy (211)

Due to the remarkable improvements in the care of childhood cancer patients, the 5-year survival rate now exceeds 80%. Long-term survivors of childhood and adolescent cancers may experience a range of adverse outcomes that occur due to treatment-specific factors including chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Read more...
Speaker:
Angela Yarbrough, DNP APRN FNP-BC CPHON®
Carlee Leopard, MSN CPNP-PC
CNE Hours
1
3:30 – 3:50 pm Wednesday, September 2

Paper Presentation: Symptoms Across the Cancer Continuum—Time Will Tell? Symptom Clusters, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life During Maintenance Therapy in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (209-1)

Children undergoing treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) report co-occurring symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbances, and depression as a symptom cluster. Physical activity (PA) is essential for development and may influence symptom severity. Nurses often advise patients and families that if they are experiencing distressing symptoms, these will improve with time during the less intensive maintenance phase of therapy.

Read more...
Speaker:
Mary Hooke, PhD APRN PCNS FAAN CPON®
CNE Hours
0.33
10:45 – 11:45 am Wednesday, September 2

Promoting Well-Being and Resilience for Pediatric Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses: An Evidence-Based Approach (204)

Occupational burnout adversely impacts the delivery of high-quality, compassionate care. Pediatric oncology advanced practice nurses (APNs) are at increased risk for burnout attributed to a high-stress environment, and the complexity of patient/family conditions. In 2019, the World Health Organization recognized burnout as an occupational phenomenon in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases.

Read more...
Speaker:
Sarah Green, DNP CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
1
10:45 – 11:00 am Wednesday, September 2

Cancer Predisposition: Li-Fraumeni Syndrome in Pediatrics, Nurses Can Make A Difference in Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival Through Screening and Education (201-1)

Oncology nurses provide care for patients and families with multiple early-onset cancers. This session will review Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a genetic cancer predisposition syndrome. It is recognized as a mutation in the TP53 gene, the most frequently mutated gene in sporadic cancers. LFS is defined as any germline mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene that is passed down in an autosomal dominant pattern.

Read more...
Speaker:
Heather Meador, MSN APRN CPNP CPHON®
Whitney Throckmorton, MPAS PA-C
CNE Hours
0.5
10:45 – 11:45 am Wednesday, September 2

Broken Bone Marrow: Comparing and Contrasting Acquired Aplastic Anemia and Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (200)

Bone marrow failure represents a diverse and rare group of hematologic disorders. Some patients have subtle findings that may go unrecognized for years, while others present with acute, severe cytopenias. As patients with an inherited disorder have increased risk of comorbidities and predisposition to malignancy, acquired aplastic anemia (AA) must be differentiated from inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) in order to provide appropriate treatment and surveillance.

Read more...
Speaker:
Lauren Zakes, MS RN CPNP-AC CPHON®
Karyn Brundige, MSN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
Subscribe to this RSS feed