5:00 – 6:00 pm Thursday, October 28

Paper Presentation: Child/Adolescent Cancer Treatment Experience — Do CSF Biomarkers Relate to Measures of Cognitive Function in Children During Maintenance Therapy for Leukemia? (210-3)

Children treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) receive central nervous system–directed chemotherapy, which is a known risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. ALL chemotherapy treatment is also associated with changes in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which may underlie changes in neurocognitive functioning.

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3:30 – 4:30 pm Friday, October 29

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — The End of Treatment and Beyond: Integrating Components of Adolescent to Adult Healthcare Transition into Patient Care (219-2)

Survival rates for childhood cancer have greatly increased as a result of therapeutic advances. Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are a challenging and dynamic cohort that require innovative, supportive care to foster knowledge and skills related to their cancer and healthcare transition.

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3:30 – 4:30 pm Friday, October 29

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — Supporting Adolescent & Young Adult Early Survivors of Childhood Cancer Through Health Care Transitions (219-1)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer face unique challenges as they transition from active cancer-directed therapy to early survivorship. Developmentally at this age, the autonomy and decision-making capacity of these patients increases, and their priorities shift to a focus on issues such as school, career, and relationships.

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3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, October 28

Administration and Management of Anti-GD2 Immunotherapy for High Risk Neuroblastoma in the Outpatient Setting (200)

Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, develops from neural crest cells that, typically, differentiate to form the sympathetic nervous system. Most neuroblastoma cases present as high-risk neuroblastoma, which has long been associated with high relapse rates and poor survival.

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