Sickle Cell Disease and Increased Hemolysis. When to Consider Evaluating for A Concurrent Hereditary Hemolytic Condition (213-2)

10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16
Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited red blood cell disorder that can lead to increased hemolysis which can result in significant anemia. When a child with sickle cell disease does not respond to therapies or interventions designed to decrease hemolysis, then a provider may want to consider the presence of a concurrent inherited hemolytic process such as G6PD, Hereditary Elliptocytosis or Gluthathione reductase deficiency.
This presentation will involve the review of each of the aforementioned inherited hemolytic process in a child with sickle cell disease. Each case will involve a review of clinical course, laboratory values, response to therapies/interventions to help reduce degree of hemolysis, as applicable, as well as the testing for and implication(s) of a concurrent inherited hemolytic process in a child with sickle cell disease. A brief overview of the incidence and pathophysiology of the three inherited hemolytic states will also be provided to the learner. This presentation will be co-presented by an APRN and a Genetic Counselor in effort to increase awareness of concurrent inherited hemolytic processes in the setting of sickle cell disease.