Preconference Course (Wednesday, October 27)

These events are an extra-cost event and is not included in the main conference registration fee. The Preconference Courses are available to in-person attendees only.

10:00 am – 5:45 pm

Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructor Course (002)

The APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructor Course is designed for any nurse who has completed the provider course and meets the qualifications to be trained to teach the course. This course provides general instruction in adult education, guidance in the planning of lectures based on the APHON program content, and instruction in administering the provider exam. Upon successful completion, nurses return to their institutions as recognized APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructors who are able to provide ongoing instruction and education to other registered nurses.

Preconference Workshops (Thursday, October 28)

Each pre-conference course is an extra-fee event. Please click on each course title to view the full description.

8:15 – 11:45 am

Practical Workings of a Pediatric and Adolescent Fertility Preservation Program, from Consults to Care Models (003)

In recent years, there has been increased emphasis on fertility preservation (FP) in pediatric hematology/oncology centers. The growing population of cancer patients and patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) for nonmalignant diseases (e.g., sickle cell disease) has resulted in more patients expressing interest in FP information and interventions at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA).

8:15 – 11:45 am

The Three C's Challenge — Crucial and Compassionate Conversations (005)

Communication is an integral part of all nursing interactions. It is the way we give and receive information to guide patient care and decision-making and respond to difficult situations. Challenging and crucial conversations often happen when the stakes are high, opinions vary, and emotions are strong. When this occurs, we have an opportunity to engage compassionately with our patients and each other.

8:15 – 11:45 am

Translating Evidence into Practice: A Workshop Providing Mentorship, Collaboration, and Support to Assist in Implementation of EBP/QI Projects (006)

Evidence-based practice (EBP), quality improvement (QI), and research are fundamental to the nursing profession’s ability to remain relevant and up-to-date in an ever-changing and complex healthcare environment. The American Nurses Association (ANA) considers scholarly inquiry one of the essential features in the “advancement of professional nursing practice”.

1:00 – 1:45 pm

Career Development Event (CDE)

Calling all Attendees to an interactive discussion —Table Talk: moving forward in the ever-changing world of nursing. How do we remain true to our passion and goals and continue to develop as hematology/oncology nurses?
Speaker:

Mary E Newman, MSN RN CPON®

Deborah A. Lafond, DNP CHPPN PPCNP-BC CPON®

 

Meredith Foxx, MSN MBA PCNS-BC APRN PPCNP-BC CPON®

Angie Blackwell, MSN RN CNS CPON®

Misty Evans, DNP APRN CPNP-AC BMTCN®

 

Cecilia A. Gladbach, BSN RN BMTCN CPON®

Janice Nuuhiwa, MSN APN NBD-BC CNS CPHON®

 

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Administration and Management of Anti-GD2 Immunotherapy for High Risk Neuroblastoma in the Outpatient Setting (200)

Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, develops from neural crest cells that, typically, differentiate to form the sympathetic nervous system. Most neuroblastoma cases present as high-risk neuroblastoma, which has long been associated with high relapse rates and poor survival.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Joint Topic: Error Prevention — Decreasing CLABSI through inter-specialty nurse rounding (201-1)

Central lines are integral in the delivery of chemotherapy and supportive care for pediatric oncology patients. However, central lines are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, especially in immunocompromised children. After a spike in central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in our hospital, our harm prevention department required weekly checks of every central line.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Joint Topic: Error Prevention — Tier Zero: Preventing Harm Before it Happens (201-2)

The care of the pediatric patient with cancer is complex. Patients are at increased risk of harm from falls, central line infections, thrombosis, and pressure injuries resulting from the treatment they receive. The Harm Prevention Program at our organization provides a structure and processes for identifying and reviewing patient harm events.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Parent/Caregiver Experience — It Can Be Hard But It's Not Bad': Documenting Caregiver Perceptions of Benefits/Burdens to Participating in Pediatric Palliative Care Research (204-1)

Documenting the benefits and burdens of pediatric palliative care research on children and their families could yield new knowledge relevant to study methods and allay uneasiness among clinicians and institutional review board members about pediatric palliative care research.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Parent/Caregiver Experience — A Systematic Review and Meta-Analytic Evaluation of Psychosocial Interventions in Parents of Children with Cancer: A Focus on Minority Outcomes (204-3)

Much progress has been made in developing interventions to address psychosocial distress in parents of children with cancer. Racial/ethnic minorities may be more prone to psychosocial distress, and little is known about intervention response among these parents. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of psychosocial interventions on anxiety and depression outcomes for parents of children with cancer, with a focus on racial/ethnic minorities.
5:00 – 6:00 pm

“It’s my Body!”: Engaging Children and Adolescents Through Goals of Care Discussions on End of Life (206)

Childhood and adolescence are a time to navigate autonomy, yet our medical system looks to parents to make “official” decisions until children are 18 years old. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children and adolescents with life-limiting illnesses be provided an opportunity to participate in decisions affecting their care in a developmentally appropriate manner.

5:00 – 6:00 pm

Joint Topic: Advanced Practice Provider Postgraduate Training Programs — Developing an Advanced Practice Provider Postgraduate Training Program for Pediatric Oncology Programs (207-1)

Advanced practice providers (APPs) are fundamental members of the pediatric oncology team, often acting as a continuous presence during the child’s treatment journey. With the rapid pace of treatment advances and an increase in the acuity of pediatric oncology patients, we know that generalized pediatric training does not adequately prepare us to care for children with cancer.

5:00 – 6:00 pm

Joint Topic: Advanced Practice Provider Postgraduate Training Programs — Advanced Practice Provider Fellowships: The Path to Specialized Excellence (207-2)

The role of the advanced practice provider (APP) has been expanding for decades and is now essential in most healthcare organizations. The majority of APP programs are population-specific (e.g., pediatric, family, adult, geriatric), with very few programs that are specialized beyond primary versus acute care.

5:00 – 6:00 pm

APHON Wants You: Become an Advocate in 2021! (209)

APHON’s mission is to support and advance nurses in the effort to optimize outcomes for children, adolescents, and young adults with blood disorders and cancer and their families. The APHON 2021–2024 Strategic Plan has identified advocacy for the expertise, research, and resources needed to advance the profession and provide care for our patients as one of four pillars vital to fulfilling this mission.

Nurses are incredibly effective advocates because they are trusted by patients and the public. As an APHON advocate, you will be part of a network of members who are knowledgeable, ready to communicate with policymakers, and equipped to cultivate relationships with legislative stakeholders, and who will help establish APHON as the leading voice for expertise in pediatric hematology/oncology nursing. APHON's Advocacy Committee works to ensure pediatric hematology/oncology nurses are kept apprised of relevant legislative and regulatory issues while providing strategies for APHON nurses to participate in advocacy opportunities. This session will engage members and give them the opportunity to learn from and interact with current APHON advocates and the Advocacy Committee. Attendees will be given the knowledge, insight, and inspiration to take the next step in leveraging their skills to bring about enduring changes that will improve outcomes for patients and their families.
5:00 – 6: 00 pm

Paper Presentation: Child/Adolescent Cancer Treatment Experience — Qualitative Content Analysis of Daily Journaling by Children with Cancer Using a Game-Based App (210-1)

The consequences of cancer persist beyond the clinical setting. Resources to assess the child’s quality of life and markers of well-being outside of the clinical setting can support a more personalized approach to care. Color Me Healthy is a new, game-based symptom assessment app that was co-designed by children with cancer and pediatric oncology clinicians.

5:00 – 6:00 pm

Paper Presentation: Child/Adolescent Cancer Treatment Experience — Analysis of AYA Cancer Patient Priority Symptoms Using Text Mining Software (210-2)

The symptoms associated with cancer treatment are a major concern for the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population. Understanding these distinct symptom experiences, especially AYAs' priority symptoms—those that take the forefront of a patient’s concern—can support healthcare providers in providing personalized care.

Speaker:
Kylie Bethards
5:00 – 6:00 pm

Paper Presentation: Child/Adolescent Cancer Treatment Experience — Do CSF Biomarkers Relate to Measures of Cognitive Function in Children During Maintenance Therapy for Leukemia? (210-3)

Children treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) receive central nervous system–directed chemotherapy, which is a known risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. ALL chemotherapy treatment is also associated with changes in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which may underlie changes in neurocognitive functioning.

5:00 – 6:00 pm

Lighting the Way in COG with MATCH: Targeted Therapies in Pediatric CNS Tumors (C211)

coglogoPediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) is a joint effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Children’s Oncology Group (COG) matching targeted therapies to specific tumor genomic sequencing in patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, brain tumors, and histiocytic disorders.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Joint Topic: Anticoagulation Therapy Anticoagulation Alphabet Soup: VKAs, LMWHs, and DOACs (214-1)

Treatment of thrombosis in pediatric patients presents many challenges. Thrombosis in pediatric patients has a wide range of etiologies, and researchers lack consensus about duration of therapy based on the thrombosis location and the presence of risk factors. Most patients under 18 years of age are treated with either parenteral low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) or vitamin K antagonists (VKAs).

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Prevention of Oral Mucositis in Children and Adolescents Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell transplant Using Photobiomodulation Therapy (215)

Oral mucositis is a significant and common toxicity experienced by patients who receive high-dose chemotherapy as a preparatory regimen for a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Furthermore, oral mucositis has been reported as the single most debilitating side effect reported by patients undergoing HCT.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Supportive Care/Quality Improvement — Changes in CLABSI Rates Following Implementation of Antibacterial Prophylaxis for Children and Adolescents with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies (216-1)

Children and adolescents with hematologic malignancies remain at heightened risk for central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), including CLABSIs involving organisms common to the lower gastrointestinal tract, which have been least responsive to interventions. This project evaluated changes in CLABSI rates following implementation of antibacterial prophylaxis for patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies.
3:30 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Supportive Care/Quality Improvement — Findings from an International Delphi-Study to Develop a Preliminary Core Set of Nursing-Sensitive Quality Indicators for Pediatric Oncology (216-2)

Although nursing-sensitive indicators (NSIs) have been developed to measure factors influencing nursing care quality and patient outcomes in general and in select specialty areas, a core set of NSIs for international pediatric oncology nursing practice does not exist.

7:30 – 8:45 am

Local Chapter Strategies-Shared Experiences to Shared Success (LCM)

The Local Chapter Committee liaisons and chapter leaders will convene to discuss topics that affect the functioning of local chapters, such as education, recruitment and retention, fundraising, and community service. Topics will be discussed in a round table manner and then presented to the whole group.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — Supporting Adolescent & Young Adult Early Survivors of Childhood Cancer Through Health Care Transitions (219-1)

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer face unique challenges as they transition from active cancer-directed therapy to early survivorship. Developmentally at this age, the autonomy and decision-making capacity of these patients increases, and their priorities shift to a focus on issues such as school, career, and relationships.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Joint Topic: AYA Health Transitions — The End of Treatment and Beyond: Integrating Components of Adolescent to Adult Healthcare Transition into Patient Care (219-2)

Survival rates for childhood cancer have greatly increased as a result of therapeutic advances. Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are a challenging and dynamic cohort that require innovative, supportive care to foster knowledge and skills related to their cancer and healthcare transition.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Managing the Complexities of the Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Patient (212)

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are recognized as one of the most devastating complications following solid organ transplantation. PTLD encompasses a wide range of clinical conditions—from benign lymphoproliferation to widespread malignancies with aggressive behavior. The development of PTLDs is driven by Epstein-Barr virus in the vast majority of pediatric PTLD cases.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Joint Topic: Developing Successful AYA and Oncofertility Programs Nuts & Bolts of Implementing an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program in the Pediatric Setting (213-1)

What have we learned over the last decade since the implementation of an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program? In this session, we will identify the unique needs of the AYA population and describe the evolving structure of our program to meet those needs.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Joint Topic: Rarer H/O Diagnoses — Manifestations and Management of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (220-2)

Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare multisystem disease that arises from the myeloid dendritic cells and often presents as common childhood ailments (Zinn, Grimes, Lin, Eckstein, Allen, & McClain, 2016). Histiocytes invade many different organ systems, including the lymph nodes, lungs, thymus, liver, spleen, bone marrow, and/or the central nervous system (McClain, 2019).

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Long Term (or Chronic) Supportive Care — Individualized Pain Plans in Managing Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (222-2)

Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the leading cause of hospital admissions in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Achieving the maximum opioid dose earlier in the admission is associated with shorter lengths of stays, allowing children suffering from SCD to spend less time in the hospital and decreasing their risk for depression and other long-term hospital-associated complications.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Long Term (or Chronic) Supportive Care — Long-term Anticoagulation in Children Utilizing Fondaparinux-A Single Pediatric Center Experience (222-3)

Fondaparinux is a synthetic, subcutaneously administered heparinoid that selectively inhibits activated factor X. Pediatric studies of fondaparinux have shown safety and efficacy profiles for the treatment of venous thromboembolism that was similar to standard pediatric anticoagulants.

10:15 – 11:15 am

General Session: State of the Nursing Science: Accentuating the Positive: Pediatric Oncology Nurses' Experiences of Caring (102)

Pediatric oncology nurses are often asked, “How can you do this work—it must be so hard?” Although they acknowledge that the care of children and families is often emotionally draining, nurses express feeling gratitude for and finding meaning in their work and demonstrate the characteristics of resilience expressed by their patients and families.

9:00 – 10:00 am

APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructors (TH1)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to updates to the Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Program and best practices for instructors.
Speaker:

Ruth Anne Herring, MSN APRN CPNP-AC/PC CPHON®

Anne Marie Sterk, MSN RN CPON®

9:00 – 10:00 am

Transplant (TH2)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to transplants.
9:00 – 10:00 am

Advance Practice Provider Issues (Except Billing!) (TH3)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to advance practice provider issues and pathways to advancement.
Speaker:
Kelly D. Anderson, MSN APRN FNP CPON®

Karyn J. Brundige, MSN CPNP

 

9:00 – 10:00 am

Hematology (TH4)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to hematology.
9:000 – 10:00 am

Zone Training and LGBTQ+ Inclusive Care (TH5)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to zone training and LGBTQ+ inclusive care.
7 – 10 pm

APHON After Dark Party — 45th Anniversary Celebration (OE1)

70sParty 

 

We are celebrating 45 years of APHON with a 70's twist — can you dig it?! Dress to impress and bring your groovy dance moves and style! We'll provide the music, lava lamps, light bites, and more. Let's not forget the party isn't a true APHON party without Karaoke. 

Space is limited and tickets will not be available on site.

Venue:
Squatters Pub
10:30 – 11:00 am

Promoting Resilience – Continuing the Discussion (TH7)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to the general session "Promoting Resilience in Children with Cancer and Their Families" with Abby Rosenberg.
Speaker:
Kathy Perko, MS PPCNP-BC CHPPN CPLC FPCN CPON®

Abby R. Rosenberg, MD MS MA

 

10:30 – 11 am

Boomers and Zoom-ers: Embracing Generational Differences in the Workforce (TH8)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to learning to work together productively by identifying generational differences in the workforce and exploiting those generational strengths that complement each other.
10:30 – 11:00 am

Integrative Therapy (TH11)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions allow attendees to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to integrative therapy.
Speaker:
Karen MacDonald, MSN RN CPNP CPON®
10:30 – 11:00 am

Medical Cannabis (TH12)

More informal than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions allow attendees to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this Town Hall to participate in discussions related to medical cannabis.
11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Building Capacity Through Incorporation of Advanced Practice Nurses in Research: Benefits and Challenges Within a Longitudinal Multisite Study (227)

A blend of approaches, including cooperative groups, consortiums, and investigator-initiated trials at both single and multiple sites, is required to rapidly evolve symptom science and translate findings to clinical care. Advanced practice nurse (APN) education uniquely blends research, clinical care, and critical thinking skills.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Program Development — Nursing Practice Advocate: An Innovative Role Created to Reduce Harm While Supporting and Engaging Bedside Nursing Staff (228-1)

In 2019, inpatient pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and stem cell transplant (SCT) units within a children’s hospital experienced an increase in central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections (MBI-LCBIs).

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Program Development — When Two Become One: Joining Two Programs to Promote Family-Centered Care for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation (228-2)

Transplants often require families to be away from family and support networks for long periods of time. Patients are often acutely ill and require specialized care. Because of the complexity of treatment and the potential for complications, transplant is stressful and challenging for patients and their caregivers. To cope with this stress, many families rely on supportive systems, including family and friends.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Paper Presentation: Program Development — Building a Sustainable and Structured Continuing Education Program for Pediatric Oncology Nurses in Vietnam (228-3)

There is a lack of continuing education opportunities for oncology nurses at the 13 pediatric cancer treatment centers in Vietnam. This presentation will discuss how nurses from the United States, Singapore, and Vietnam collaborated to develop an in-country, web-based educational program utilizing a variety of virtual teaching strategies.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Clinical Trials in the Children’s Oncology Group: A Case Study Approach (C229)

coglogoClinical trials are essential in the treatment of pediatric and young adult patients with cancer and have resulted in dramatic improvements in cure rates over the years. Because of clinical trials, we are now better able to understand the biology of different types of cancers affecting children and young adults and determine the best treatment options.

2:15 – 3:15 pm

Perspectives on supporting schooling for children with cancer: Findings from two PCORI Engagement Projects (230)

Education is an important social determinant of health, and treatment for childhood cancers can result in long-term neurocognitive effects (deficits in processing speed, working memory, executive function, and attention), which are associated with reduced educational attainment, employment, and ability to live independently.

2:15 – 3:15 pm

Treating Smarter, Not Harder: Abandoning Intensification and Replacing with Immunotherapy for Patients with Down Syndrome and B-ALL (C234)

coglogoChildren with Down syndrome (DS) have a striking predisposition for developing acute leukemia, with a 40-fold increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) compared to non-DS patients (Wadhwa et al, 2017). Approximately 3% of children with ALL have DS, and these children have inferior outcomes and higher rates of treatment-related mortality (TRM) and are at greater risk of relapse (Buitenkamp et al., 2014).

3:30 – 4:45 pm

Closing Keynote: Dream. Believe. Achieve! (104)

Shannon Bahrke will take you on a thrilling journey of her success through pivotal points in her 12-year career on the U.S. Ski Team. She will reveal how she overcame obstacles, doubts, and fears to ultimately earn two Olympic medals. Shannon will also share how the same mindset, tools, and strategies directly correlate to business and how everyone can execute them to achieve their maximum potential!