COG Sessions

3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Targeting Patient and Family Education for ALK/MEK Inhibitor Therapy: What We Learned from the COG Nursing Evidenced Based Project (C204)

coglogoChildren with cancer have historically received multiple modalities of therapy to treat their disease processes including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplant. These modalities incur the potential for significant acute toxicity and late effects from therapy. In the last decade, the addition of a new modality known as biotherapy has become an integral player in the treatment of pediatric cancers. Biotherapy includes targeted therapies used to attack and destroy cancer cells while minimizing effects on healthy cells and tissue. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Hot Topics in Pediatric Oncology: Updates from the Children’s Oncology Group (C222)

Despite the pandemic, the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) has produced 237 publications since the beginning of 2020. The magnitude of this productivity makes it difficult for health care professionals to remain up to date with new knowledge. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight results from four recent, COG publications and assist nurses in translating evidence into their practice.  Read more...
9:45 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Using Their Own Words: AYA Cancer Patients as Influencers in COG Clinical Trials (C216)

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients continue to be a conundrum for providers, researchers, and health care systems. Previous challenges for AYA oncology care have been identified as delayed diagnosis, lack of insurance, limited clinical trial availability and enrollment, tumor biology, unique toxicity profiles, distinct psychosocial issues, and more. While there has been advancement in the treatment of AYAs with cancer, there is a paucity of information about how that treatment impacts the AYA cancer patient’s life, both during treatment and beyond. Read more...
11:00 am – 12:00 pm Saturday, September 17

Using Shared Experience to Define Optimal Care for Patients Receiving Blinatumomab on COG Clinical Trials (C228)

Targeted therapies that leverage and harness the immune system to treat malignancies have become one of the most rapidly growing treatment approaches in pediatric oncology. Blinatumomab, an immunotherapy, is one such approach which has generated significant momentum in the treatment of pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) (1). In the relapsed space Blinatumomab has demonstrated improved survival and decreased rates of significant toxicity, compared to standard chemotherapy. Read more...