2:50 – 3:10 pm Thursday, September 3

Paper Presentations: Global Health — WHO Global Childhood Cancer Initiative: Relevance for Nursing Immigrant and Vulnerable Families Facing Childhood Cancer in the United States (220-2)

In 2017, the WHO World Health Assembly passed the Cancer Prevention and Control through an Integrated Approach (WHA70.12) resolution under a wide agreement that cancer is an increasing public health issue. In 2018, WHO created the Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer (GICC) to galvanize the Ministries of Health to prioritize childhood cancer in low- and middle-income countries (L&MIC).

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Speaker:
Julia Challinor, PhD RN MA Ed MSc Medical Anthropology
CNE Hours
0.33
3:10–3:30 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Symptom Reporting Strategies—Patient and Parent Experiences of Cancer Symptoms as Assessed by the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale for Children (231-3)

Treatment for childhood cancer is associated with symptoms that contribute to poorer psychological and physical functioning and decreased quality of life. Symptom assessment scales have been used to identify the prevalence, severity, and distress related to cancer treatment.

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Speaker:
Melody Hellsten, DNP APRN PPCNP-BC CHPPN
CNE Hours
0.34
2:50 – 3:10 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Symptom Reporting Strategies—Perceived Usefulness and User Satisfaction of Electronic and Paper-and-Pencil Symptom Tracking Diaries for Young Children with Cancer: Parent Perspectives (231-2)

"Because much of the cancer care for young children occurs in the outpatient setting, parents have the responsibility of identifying and responding to the child’s symptoms at home. Having a tool that parents could use to record their child's daily symptoms could help to provide insight into the symptoms the child is experiencing. Although multiple resources have been developed to support symptom tracking, ensuring usability is key.

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Speaker:
Sharifa Al-Qaaydeh, PhD RN
CNE Hours
0.33
2:30 – 2:50 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Symptom Reporting Strategies—Examining Self-Reported Pain of School-Age Children Undergoing Treatment for Cancer Using a Game-Based App (231-1)

The goal of this presentation is to describe the daily pain experiences reported by 19 school-age children with cancer participating in a trial of a game-based symptom assessment app. We will discuss the prevalence of pain and how participants elected to communicate their pain within the app, using child-centric rating scales, an avatar to localize pain, and free-text responses.

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Speaker:
Katherine Bernier Carney, PhD RN
CNE Hours
0.33
12:55 – 1:15 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Outcomes of Serious Illness on Nurses, Patients, and Families—Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Nurses: An Integrative Review (225-3)

"Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that can occur from direct or indirect exposure to traumatic events. Nurses are at risk of developing PTSD due to their indirect and/or direct exposure to traumatic situations while providing care to vulnerable patient populations.

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Speaker:
Michelle Schuster, MSN RN CPHON®
CNE Hours
0.34
12:35 – 12:55 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Outcomes of Serious Illness on Nurses, Patients, and Families—Inpatient Deaths of Children with Cancer: DNAR and CPR Events in Children Who Don’t Survive to Hospital Discharge (225-2)

Death in children with malignancy may result from refractory disease or acute complications during therapy. In this population, little is known about the medical interventions received in the last week of life from the overall cohort of children who die from cancer or related complications as inpatients. Perceptions of under- or over-treatment can cause distress among families and staff, yet the prevalence of do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders, use of CPR, and other supportive therapies remains poorly described.

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Speaker:

Liza-Marie Johnson, MD MPH MSB HEC-C

Belinda Mandrell, PhD RN CPNP

CNE Hours
0.33
12:15 – 12:35 pm Friday, September 4

Paper Presentation: Outcomes of Serious Illness on Nurses, Patients, and Families—Keeping a Positive Outlook – Strategies, Threats, and Outcomes for Parents of Children with Cancer and Other Serious Illness (225-1)

Parents who make end-of-life decisions for their seriously ill children do so according to their individual definitions of ‘being a good parent’ to their seriously ill child. This pediatric cancer nursing concept, developed by Pamela Hinds, has been applied to parents of critically ill children but has potential relevance for other pediatric contexts.

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Speaker:
Katherine Kelly, PhD APRN PCNS-BC CPON®
CNE Hours
0.33
2:10 – 3:30 pm Thursday, September 3

Paper Presentation: Global Health—Long-Distance Coaching for a Quality Improvement Initiative to Improve Nursing Assessment and Management of Nausea and Vomiting in Marrakech, Morocco (220-3)

Quality improvement (QI) in health care consists of systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvements in the patient experience. While QI methodology has long been included as a core component of nursing education and professional development in institutions in the United States, QI methodology is novel in many low- and middle-income countries.

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Speaker:
Elizabeth Sniderman, MSN APRN CPNP-AC CPHON®
CNE Hours
0.34
2:30 – 2:50 pm Thursday, September 3

Paper Presenation: Global Health—POINTE: A Novel Way of Spreading Global Pediatric Oncology Nursing Knowledge (220-1)

Well-trained nurses are vital for optimal outcomes in pediatric oncology. One of the most significant barriers to adequately treating children with cancer in resource-constrained settings is a lack of healthcare workers in general and even fewer with specialty training in pediatric oncology.

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Speaker:
Rachael Kunkel, BSN RN CPN CPHON®
CNE Hours
0.33
12:55 – 1:15 pm Thursday, September 3

Paper Presentation: Supporting Patient Well-Being and Quality of Life—Psychosocial interventions to improve social health of adolescents and young adults with cancer: A review (214-3)

The incidence of cancer diagnosis in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population has been increasing, and more frequently these patients are being cared for at pediatric institutions. The AYA population has a set of psychosocial needs that differ from other age groups. Failure to tend to these needs leads to a host of negative health outcomes from cancer and therapy and negatively impacts the quality of life.

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Speaker:
Clifton Thornton, MSN RN CNMT CPNP
CNE Hours
0.34
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