Concurrent Sessions

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Onco-Critical Care 101 (209-2)

Pediatric Oncology nurses are frequently exposed to patients with oncologic emergencies and who become critically ill requiring transfer to the PICU. They are familiar with conditions requiring transfer but happens to these patients while they are in the PICU? When the patient is transferred back to the regular oncology floor or presents back in clinic, it is helpful for the nurse to know what happened to their patient in the PICU. Common oncology critical care interventions such as CRRT, vasopressors, respiratory support, ect are largely unfamiliar to oncology nurses but can be helpful to understand for post PICU care and in situations where care must be initiated by the nurse on the floor. This presentation will cover the basics of Oncology Critical Care including recognizing oncologic emergencies that should trigger transfer to PICU and how these conditions are treated once the patient is in the PICU. Read more...
Speaker:
Katie Gardner MSN APRN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
.50
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Toward a Cure for Sickle Cell Disease: Exploring Gene Therapy (210)

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited blood disorder worldwide. It is estimated that 300,000 babies are born with SCD every year and it occurs largely in descendants of Sub Saharan Africa. SCD is caused by a specific mutation in the beta globin gene that results in sickle hemoglobin production. Sickle hemoglobin polymerization leads to red blood cell sickling, chronic hemolysis and vaso - occlusion. Patients with SCD experience significant pain crisis and end organ damage that leads to a decreased lifespan with a median life expectancy in the United States of 43 years. At this time, the only known cure for SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) most often with matched sibling donors. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

You Deserve to Preserve: A Proposal to Offer Fertility Preservation to All Eligible Pediatric Oncology Patients (221)

Fertility preservation, the opportunity to preserve one’s ability to have genetically-related children prior to damaging or destroying the reproductive system, is a young but rapidly expanding field. Historically, fertility preservation has only been available to postpubertal male and female cancer patients via oocyte, embryo, and sperm cryopreservation. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia: A Clinical Overview (220)

Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is one of the most common hematologic conditions encountered in pediatric hematology and is a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific testing available to confirm the condition. While fairly consistent and typical in presentation, the astute clinician must be able to differentiate between immune and nonimmune etiologies of thrombocytopenia in order to confirm an accurate diagnosis, etiology, and treatment plan while shielding the patient from unnecessary testing and workup. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

Can Symptom Scores And Symptom Profiles Be More Clinically Useful? (219)

Symptom science has rapidly evolved over the past two decades, with progression from symptom measurement to sophisticated approaches to analyzing symptom data to illuminate symptom patterns. Cluster and person-specific approaches have been used in pediatric oncology research, but discussion of the clinical value of data generated from these approaches is lacking. Read more...
4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Friday, September 16

It's All About the Messaging-Pediatric Palliative Care and Communication (218)

Each year, approximately 16,800 children are diagnosed with cancer. With this diagnosis comes both the hope for a cure and the fear of death. Both hope and fear require our attention and understanding. Children diagnosed with cancer need skilled intradisciplinary treatment teams that provide guidance and support in decisions related to therapy modalities aimed at treating the cancer. Aiming for cure is the hope of all children and families facing a cancer diagnosis. Goals of therapy become very important to designing the best treatment for the child.

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9:45 am – 10:50 am Friday, September 16

Neurofibromatosis Therapeutics Program: Program Development, Tumor Treatment, and Side Effect Management (215)

The advanced practice provider is instrumental in designing, developing, and growing a program to treat tumors associated with Neurofibromatosis (NF) Type 1 and 2. Both NF1 and NF2 are autosomal dominant genetic disorders associated with the growth of both benign and malignant tumors of the peripheral and central nervous system. In the last two years selumetinib, a MEK inhibitor, gained FDA approval for treatment of plexiform neurofibromas in the children with NF. Read more...
9:45 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Photobiomodulation for Prevention and Treatment of Oral Mucositis: Part II (214)

Oral mucositis is a significant and common toxicity experienced by patients who receive high-dose chemotherapy as a preparatory regimen for a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Photobiomodulation has been found to be feasible with significant efficacy in preventing the progression of oral mucositis in patients undergoing HCT. Read more...
10:15 am – 10:45 am Friday, September 16

Sickle Cell Disease and Increased Hemolysis. When to Consider Evaluating for A Concurrent Hereditary Hemolytic Condition (213-2)

Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited red blood cell disorder that can lead to increased hemolysis which can result in significant anemia. When a child with sickle cell disease does not respond to therapies or interventions designed to decrease hemolysis, then a provider may want to consider the presence of a concurrent inherited hemolytic process such as G6PD, Hereditary Elliptocytosis or Gluthathione reductase deficiency. Read more...