Concurrent Sessions

3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Building a Sickle Cell Nurse Champions Program to improve patient care and nursing performance (200)

The social upheaval throughout the country during the summer of 2020 raised international awareness about the inequities people of color face throughout their lives. Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are a particular group that experiences healthcare disparities. The Sickle Cell Nurse Champion Program was created as a novel educational program to improve patient care and nursing performance. To build this program, we conducted a needs assessment from our patients and parents. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

We're Done! Now What? Determining End of Treatment Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and their Parents (201)

As the number of child cancer survivors (CCS) increases, so has the recognition of the unique needs of this group throughout the cancer-survivorship continuum. The end of cancer treatment (EOT) is a critical timepoint on this continuum. Family support and education needs at EOT are estimated to be at a similar level to what they were at diagnosis. Indeed, CCS and their parents report feeling unprepared for the physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges inherent in recovering from treatment and reintegrating back into school, work, and family life. Read more...
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

Grow Your Professional Skills: Become a Peer Reviewer for a Journal (202)

Serving as a peer reviewer for a journal is an opportunity to serve your professional specialty, advance your knowledge and skills as a writer, and experience professional growth. Additionally, serving as a journal reviewer is recognized in performance reviews and can contribute to professional advancement on a clinical ladder. Peer reviewing is rewarding as you guide authors to improve their manuscripts and contribute to steering nursing science and practice.

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3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 15

CBD, THC, GVH, MMJ: Practical Ways to Make Sense of the Alphabet Soup (203)

Many pediatric oncology patients report medical marijuana (MMJ) and hemp-based CBD use. Hemp is now federally legal under the Farm Bill since December 2018 and hemp-based cannabinoid products are widely available. Research focused on cannabis and its’ use in oncology, hematology, and bone marrow transplant is continuing to grow. A study in Israel looks at adding cannabis to the treatment of graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplant. Read more...
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Bench to Bedside: DNP and Nurse Researcher Collaboration (206)

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in nursing, while different in focus, in collaboration serve as integral, interrelated components in quality improvement, evidenced-based practice, research and dissemination. The strength in combining the research appraisal and investigation of PhD-prepared nurse and the DNP-prepared nurses’ clinical experience and skill offers opportunities to address gaps in patient care and bring the “bench to the bedside”.In pediatric hematology/oncology, both the DNP and PhD-prepared nurse are well positioned to be drivers of practice change and improvement. By recognizing each other’s strengths, this group of scholarly nurses can create a partnership to develop and implement evidenced-based care, impact the quality of care delivered and enhance the patient experience. In this session, attendees will follow along the presenter’s journey as they collaborate to develop their first clinical research study focused in childhood leukemia, and share their lessons learned, failures, mistakes to avoid and overall success. Read more...
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Prior Authorization: Where was that in Nursing School? (207-1)

The world of healthcare has been dominated by discussion about COVID-19 over the past 2 years. At the same time, the field of pediatric hematology-oncology has continued to move forward with new therapies which offer hope for enhanced outcomes, specifically in the field of precision medicine. The topic that is not often recognized in those discussions is the growing complexity of payment for these therapies, as well as therapies that have been considered “standard” for many years. Nurses may be seeing increased requirement to participate in discussions about the cost or prior authorization of medications for their patients. In addition to these requirements, third party payors have growing expectations for prior authorization. At the same time, there are more third-party payor options on the market for families to choose, and unfortunately, some families are choosing plans that may not provide adequate coverage. The political climate has changed, as well, and the individual mandate for coverage, which was originally a part of the Affordable Care Act, was rescinded. New legislation has now created the No Surprises Act, which requires up-front estimate of the cost of care for specific situations. There was a time when care was scheduled as expected, and there was no need to worry about prior authorization, but in today’s world, nurses are likely hearing more and more about the status or need for “approval” of care in advance. This session will provide an overview of what pediatric hematology-oncology nurses may be experiencing as a part of daily operations in the care of these patients and families. An evolving model of multidisciplinary involvement to assure timely care in the face of growing third party payor expectations will be shared. Read more...
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Thursday, September 15

Compassionate Use, Expanded Access, and Patient Assistance ? Obtaining Life-Saving Medications When a Clinical Trial is Not Available (207-2)

The vast majority of clinical trials conducted in oncology are not open to patients under the age of 18 years old, leaving pediatric cancer patients with a very limited selection of FDA-approved therapies. Though clinical trials are the safest and most-beneficial means of determining the effectiveness of medications, not all patients have the option to enroll in clinical trials due to barriers such as patient clinical status, geographic location, or enrollment caps. In other circumstances where FDA-approved therapies are commercially available, insurance companies simply deny payment for off-label use of these expensive medications based on disease categories instead of oncogenic targets. Compassionate use programs, also known as expanded access trials or single patient investigational new drugs, provide opportunity for these patients to obtain possibly life-saving therapies. This interactive session will help demystify the process of gaining access to medical therapies on behalf of our patients. The different terms used in the compassionate use process will be discussed, as well as the specific steps oncology teams can take to apply to the FDA for approval of experimental medications. Case studies will provide examples of how the compassionate use process works in different circumstances as well as demonstrate clinical outcomes. Payment assistance programs and other resources to help patients pay for FDA-approved medications will also be covered. Read more...
Speaker:

Jason Morris MSN CPNP-PC CPHON®

Anne Raines, MSN, RN, CPHON

CNE Hours
.50
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

The Role of the Pediatric Clinical Research Nurse in the Management of Severe Aplastic Anemia (208-1)

Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a serious and life-threatening condition with an unknown etiology, involving improper production of stem cells due to damaged bone marrow. Without functional stem cells, the body is depleted of red blood cells, white blood cells, and/or platelets. With only 600 to 900 cases diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone, SAA is rare. Most patients are only provided supportive care measures: receiving blood transfusions to manage symptoms and adhere to complex medication regimens to limit complications; however, advancements in treatment of SAA are made possible through clinical research trials. The Clinical Research Nurse (CRN) must address the clinical needs of the research patient, but also be sensitive to the psychosocial and ethical issues of supporting pediatric research patients. This case study presents a 7-year old Mongolian patient, “M.B.”, with refractory SAA, who failed standard immunosuppressive therapy and failed to engraft from a previous expanded umbilical cord stem cell transplant. M.B. was enrolled in a clinical research protocol in which he underwent a haplo-identical transplantation using peripheral blood stem cells and post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis using Cyclophosphamide. M.B.’s complex clinical trajectory will unfold over the course of the case study, with the role of the Clinical Research Nurse highlighted. In addition to clinical complications, the COVID-19 pandemic added an additional layer of psychosocial and ethical complexities for M.B. and his family to navigate. Application of the Clinical Research Nurse Domain of Practice ensures that the bedside nurse addresses the holistic needs of the research patient and caregiver at the bedside, while also maintaining the integrity of the research protocol. Read more...
Speaker:
Alejandra Castillo MSN RN
CNE Hours
.50
9:45 – 10:45 am Thursday, September 15

Using Your Resources-The Role Of A Clinical Resource Nurse (208-2)

Patient census and acuity throughout healthcare institutions continue to rise as staffing numbers and resources remain the same. Nursing is asked to create innovative ways to maximize staff productivity and efficiency, decrease burnout and increase retention while improving patient care. The development of a Clinical Resource Nurse (CRN) is an innovative approach to maximize the nurse's clinical potential and improve unit efficiency while working within the context of the current staffing model.

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5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Thursday, September 15

Neuro 911: Managing Neurologic Complications in Pediatric Oncology Patients (209-1)

Neurologic complications are common in pediatric patients with all types of malignancies. These complications can arise from the disease process itself or as a result of one of our therapies. Oncology nurses care for patients receiving multi-modal therapy with chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. It is important to recognize these complications quickly and correctly. Initiating treatment quickly may reduce pain, may prevent further progression and permanent deficits. Read more...