3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, September 13

Management of Retinoblastoma in 2018: A Nursing Perspective (201)

1CNE  Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary ocular malignancy of young children. Approximately 8,000 children are diagnosed with RB worldwide annually. If caught early RB can be cured, preserving life, vision, and the eye(s). At our institution, the treatment of retinoblastoma has evolved dramatically over the past decade. Utilization of focal therapies has transformed our treatment algorithms, patient outcomes and nursing care; our RB overall survival exceeds international rates. Localized treatments include chemotherapy administered directly into the eye via the ophthalmic artery or intra-vitreously, laser photocoagulation, cryotherapy, and, in cases of very advanced eyes, plaque brachytherapy or enucleation.

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Saturday, September 15
7:30 – 8:45 am
CNE Presentation

Healing Hope and the Promise of Healthy Survivorship — Recognition Breakfast for Certified Oncology Nurses* (RB)

Please note that the breakfast has reached the max capacity.

1CNE  Wendy S. Harpham is a doctor of internal medicine, 27-year cancer survivor, best-selling author, nationally recognized speaker and patient advocate. From both sides of the stethoscope, Wendy has used her useful perspective to help patients become Healthy Survivors -- namely, survivors who get good care and live as fully as possible.

Since her diagnosis, Wendy has played an important role in raising awareness among clinicians and in empowering patients to talk with their healthcare team about the challenges of survivorship, such as coping with post-treatment fatigue, raising healthy children when a parent has cancer, and participating in clinical trials.

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Speaker:
Wendy S. Harpham, MD
2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Are You an APN Searching for COG Supportive Care Guidelines? COG Guideline Development/Endorsement Process with Practical Applications (C234)

coglogo 1CNE Since the 1970s survival rates for most types of pediatric cancer have continued to improve, with about 80% of patients now expected to become long-term survivors. However, this incredible success requires intensive treatments that are often associated with significant acute and long-term side effects. These side effects of pediatric cancer therapy can negatively impact a patient’s symptom experience and quality of life. Lack of effective symptom management can potentially impact outcomes through delays in proven curative treatments, dose reductions, and patient nonadherence to the treatment plan.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

1CNE  The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g. inpatient v. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g. language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

They Just Don’t Get It! Unconscious Bias in Caring for Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders (232)

1CNE  Caring for a child with serious illness, especially when cure is uncertain, may be one of the most difficult and yet most rewarding experiences for all members of the healthcare team. This presentation examines how unconscious bias, or our personal “blind spot”, from the perspectives of the hematology/oncology team, family members, and palliative care team interferes with the ability of the to accept and integrate palliative care for children with high-risk and advanced hematologic or oncologic diagnoses.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Transfusions in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients: As Easy As ABO (231)

1CNE  Transfusion of blood products is an essential part of caring for children with benign hematologic disorders, malignant diseases, and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One challenge in pediatric patients is the broad age range for patients that span from neonates to young adults. Recent studies have shown that there is a wide variability in practice among pediatric programs in the indications for transfusions, CMV prevention, and management of patients who become refractory to transfusions.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

DSRCT: A Pediatric Oncology Rarity (230)

1CNE  Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is one of the rarest pediatric tumors and was only recently classified in 1989. Categorized under sarcomas, DSRCT under the microscopic is a fusion of a both a wilms and ewing sarcoma gene. Although known as a mostly surgical tumor, chemotherapy, radiation, and new treatments like immunotherapy are vital in the battle against this fatal disease. DSRCT is known mostly in the adolescent and young adult population, where the rate of occurrence is predominantly in males. In a retrospective cohort analysis published in 2014 from the Journal of Cancer Epidemiology, the 5-year survival rate was found to be just 33.3% (Lettieri, Garcia-Filion, Hingorani, 2014). Factors impacting survival rate are the overall oncology role to treatment and management.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

COG Clinical Trials: Empowered Nurses the Key to their Success (C229)

coglogo1CNE  In pediatric oncology, clinical trials are conducted to improve survival rates, understand disease biology, and prevent or improve management of treatment-related acute and long-term side effects. The majority of children newly diagnosed with cancer in North America are treated on Children’s Oncology Group (COG) clinical trials. In the last 50 years clinical trials in pediatric oncology have increased the overall 5-year survival rate from under 10% to over 80% today. Nurses are an integral part of the success of these trials.

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12:10 – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Paper Presentations: Clinical Care Issues — Improving Patient Identification Practices in a Central American Pediatric Cancer Hospital (228-3)

1CNE  Participants will identify the nurse’s unique role in promoting a culture of safety and continuous quality improvement through the implementation of a correct patient identification quality improvement project in a Central American pediatric cancer hospital.

Disclaimer: [1 CH] will be awarded for attending all three paper presentations presented during this timeslot. Partial credit is not available.

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11:50 am – 12:10 pm Saturday, September 15

Paper Presentations: Clinical Care Issues — Implementation of an Inpatient Oncology Resource Nurse to Standardize and Improve Chemotherapy Admission Workflow (228-2)

1CNE  Basis of inquiry: Our 32-bed inpatient oncology unit identified delays in initiating chemotherapy for scheduled patients. With an increased census and tightened staffing ratios, the chemotherapy admission process became increasingly inefficient. These delays resulted in frustration for both patients and healthcare providers.

Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this project was to devise and evaluate a more efficient and consistent admission process through the use of a resource nurse. We sought to develop a workflow to deliver “on time” chemotherapy, defined as prior to shift change at 7 pm. This would reduce delays and increase satisfaction of patients, families, and providers.

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