4:45 – 5:05 pm Thursday, September 13

Paper Presentation: Engaging Patients and Providers in the Research Process — Engaging Children and Healthcare Providers in the Co-Design of a Mobile, Technology-Based Symptom Assessment App (210-1)

1CNE Basis of inquiry: Mobile technology supports child-centric approaches to symptom reporting by incorporating game-based features to support children in reporting symptoms.

Purpose/Objectives: We describe the development of a child-centric symptom assessment app using school-age children (6–12 years) receiving treatment for cancer and pediatric oncology healthcare providers as co-designers. 

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4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, September 13

Iron Overload: Implications in Hematology, Oncology, and HSCT Patients (207)

1CNE Iron is a vital mineral which is essential for life. Humans obtain iron through ingestion in foods where absorption is tightly regulated. Iron is bound to transferrin for transport due to the ability of labile plasma iron to cause oxidative damage to tissues and organs. Iron loss occurs through desquamation of the small intestine and menses in women and equals 1–2 mg Fe/day, similar to absorption. Blood transfusions are a lifesaving therapy for hematology patients as well as oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. Anemia, a common side effect of cancer and chemotherapy, used to be treated with erythropoietin stimulators until concerns were raised about their effect on tumor growth. Blood transfusions are a safe, readily available method to increase patient’s hemoglobin and can be done easily in the outpatient setting. However, each unit of blood contains 200–250 mg of iron which is released as the transfused blood cells break down.

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4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, September 13

Pediatric Cancer Predisposition: What the Clinician Needs to Know (206)

1CNE  Precision medicine has emerged with the advancement of genetic technologies and knowledge of molecular pathogenesis. A clinical translation of precision medicine in pediatric oncology lies in hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, which plague approximately 10% of patients and families. Proper identification of these patients, appropriate genetic testing and counseling, and an understanding of short-term treatment implications and long-term screening protocols are all essential to comprehensive care for patients and families with cancer predisposition syndromes. Current knowledge of pediatric cancer predisposition syndromes, referral and identification, and treatment and long-term follow up will be discussed. Moreover, a case series and easy reference tools for clinical practice will be presented.

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Bone Marrow Transplant for Hematology Patients: Caring for the Patient from Diagnosis to Long Term Follow Up (006)

3.25CNE  There are an increasing numbers of patients with hematologic transplant as a curative therapy, for previously life-threatening and life-limiting diagnosis. There continues to be advancement in this area on options available to patients to allow for overall increased survival and improved outcomes. With these new advancements, there presents a challenge to manage these patients effectively pre- and post-transplant to improve outcomes and survival. This presentation will provide an overview of transplant for hematology patients, which will include indications for transplant, criteria to qualify for transplant, pre- and post-transplant considerations (infectious, social, etc.), an overview of medications specific to hematologic conditions prior to transplant; types of transplants used, hematologic specific complications pre- and post-transplant, long-term follow up considerations in the post-transplant patient, and new and emerging therapies in the hematology patient and transplant.

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9:45 – 10:45 am Friday, September 14

General Session: Oral Medicine for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing (102)

1CNE  Pediatric hematology/oncology nurses are responsible for the comprehensive care of children with diverse and complex medical conditions, including both non-malignant and malignant diseases. For reasons related to both underlying disease pathology as well as treatment-related toxicities, this unique patient population is at risk of developing a wide spectrum of oral complications that can significantly impact patients.

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