5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Infant ALL: Rearranged for the Big Screen! Providing Care on COG AALL15P1, Nurses in a Leading Role! (C211)

coglogoAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric malignancy, with 5-year overall survival rates exceeding 90% (Hunger, Lu, Devidas, Camitta, Gaynon, Winick, 2012). Unfortunately, infants with ALL are an exception to the improving survival trends and remain one of the most challenging populations in pediatric hematology/oncology (Kotecha, Gottardo, Kees, Cole, 2014).

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2:15–3:15 pm Saturday, September 7

A New Tool for Documenting the Child's Report of Cancer Treatment Toxicity (230)

The National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the standard lexicon for grading adverse events (AEs) in oncology trials. Children with cancer experience significant numbers of subjective AEs such as fatigue, pain, or sadness. The current standard is that AEs are reported only by clinicians, even though 30% of the 790 CTCAE items are subjective.

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

The Autoimmune Cytopenias: Deactivating the Self-Destruct Sequence (225)

Autoimmune cytopenias include autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), autoimmune neutropenia (AIN), and Evan’s syndrome (ES). This diverse group of hematologic disorders is characterized by the production of autoantibodies by the patient’s own immune system against hematopoietic cells in the blood or bone marrow.

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Speaker:
Karyn Brundige, MSN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
RX Hours
0.17
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Decoding the Mystery of Gene Therapy – An Overview for Nursing (208)

The decoding of the human genome has provided scientists and researchers a new pathway to developing potential curative therapies for life-threatening or otherwise fatal illnesses. The development of these gene therapies is moving at lightning speed, translating this novel therapy from the bench to the bedside at a record pace. What was once thought of as a highly experimental approach, these therapies are quickly becoming standard of care, as demonstrated by the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of several gene therapies, specifically Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. These therapies are complex both in their scientific development and, more importantly, in their clinical delivery.

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Speaker:
Colleen Dansereau, MSN RN CPN
CNE Hours
1
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