2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

1CNE  The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g. inpatient v. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g. language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

Read more...
11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Comprehensive Care for Thalassemia (226)

1CNE  Thalassemia is becoming a more common diagnosis seen in pediatric hematology/oncology centers. The term thalassemia describes a group of very complex diseases that requires thorough, comprehensive care to improve outcomes and quality of life for these patients. A complicating factor is that patients often are immigrants or refugees with language and cultural barriers and other socioeconomic issues. The care of these patients require a multidisciplinary approach and a strong understanding of the pathophysiology, specific complications, current treatments, and new and emerging therapies.

Read more...
3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Beyond the Cure: The Children’s Oncology Group’s Efforts to Improve Outcomes for Pediatric Cancer Patients Long after Treatment has Finished (C223)

coglogo1CNE  Childhood cancer survivors are living longer than ever before, with overall survival rates exceeding 80%. As a result, survivors also are living with chronic late health effects related to their curative treatments, with 40% of survivors experiencing a severe, disabling, and life-threatening or fatal late effect at 30 years post-treatment. Late effects may include second malignancies, endocrinopathies, cardiomyopathy, infertility, pulmonary function deficits, renal/ocular/auditory disorders, neurocognitive deficits, and metabolic syndrome. Recent studies report that cumulative incidence of late effects may be even higher than previously reported, with survivors having 3 to 5 treatment-related chronic health conditions by the age of 50.

Read more...
3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Running on Empty: Inherited Bone Marrow Failure (219)

1CNE Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are a diverse group of hematologic disorders. Despite the name, some children have new, not inherited, genetic mutations. These mutations can result in congenital abnormalities or disease in specific organs or increased cancer predisposition. Through a series of patient vignettes we will follow six patients with common syndromes highlighting clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and evidence-based treatment and monitoring recommendations. We also will explore the impact of a genetic diagnosis on the psychological and social well-being of families as the parents grapple with the decision whether to pursue genetic testing for themselves or their other children.

Read more...
4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, September 13

Pediatric Cancer Predisposition: What the Clinician Needs to Know (206)

1CNE  Precision medicine has emerged with the advancement of genetic technologies and knowledge of molecular pathogenesis. A clinical translation of precision medicine in pediatric oncology lies in hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, which plague approximately 10% of patients and families. Proper identification of these patients, appropriate genetic testing and counseling, and an understanding of short-term treatment implications and long-term screening protocols are all essential to comprehensive care for patients and families with cancer predisposition syndromes. Current knowledge of pediatric cancer predisposition syndromes, referral and identification, and treatment and long-term follow up will be discussed. Moreover, a case series and easy reference tools for clinical practice will be presented.

Read more...
3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, September 13

Putting the Horse before the CAR–T! Educating Nurses on Algorithms to Recognize Cytokine Release Syndrome and CAR–T Related Encephalopathy Syndrome (203)

1CNE  Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapies, recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of hematologic malignancies in pediatric and adult populations, offer remarkable promise for patients with previously treated-refractory disease. Kymriah™, the first FDA-approved agent for the treatment of children and young adults up to 25 years of age with relapsed or refractory B–cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, demonstrates an overall remission rates 83%. Significant, potentially life-threatening toxicities accompany these promising outcomes, most notably cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and CAR–related encephalopathy syndrome (CRES). Early identification and strategic management of symptoms are critical to support positive patient outcomes. An interprofessional team developed evidence-based algorithms for the diagnosis and management of CAR therapy-related toxicities.

Read more...

Bone Marrow Transplant for Hematology Patients: Caring for the Patient from Diagnosis to Long Term Follow Up (006)

3.25CNE  There are an increasing numbers of patients with hematologic transplant as a curative therapy, for previously life-threatening and life-limiting diagnosis. There continues to be advancement in this area on options available to patients to allow for overall increased survival and improved outcomes. With these new advancements, there presents a challenge to manage these patients effectively pre- and post-transplant to improve outcomes and survival. This presentation will provide an overview of transplant for hematology patients, which will include indications for transplant, criteria to qualify for transplant, pre- and post-transplant considerations (infectious, social, etc.), an overview of medications specific to hematologic conditions prior to transplant; types of transplants used, hematologic specific complications pre- and post-transplant, long-term follow up considerations in the post-transplant patient, and new and emerging therapies in the hematology patient and transplant.

Read more...

Consulting, Arranging and Referring: How to Create the Connections Needed for a Successful CAR T Patient Experience (004)

3.25CNE  Leukemia is the number one cause of pediatric cancer mortality. In addition, there are poor outcomes for second and greater relapses of ALL, so there is a need for new novel therapies (Novartis, 2015). Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells (CAR T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. (Wang, Wu Han, 2017). Because CAR-T therapy success can be contingent on factors such as disease burden and previous therapy, communication between referring and referral centers to facilitate rapid consultation is essential.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed