3:30 – 4:45 pm Saturday, September 7

Closing Keynote: Why We Chose Nursing and How Nursing Continues to Choose Us (104)

Nurse Kelley explores the intimate moments we have within our profession that remind us why we chose nursing in the first place and how nursing continues to choose us throughout our career. Through sharing her journey in the Miss America Organization, Kelley explains how her year as Miss Colorado quickly turned into a year of nursing advocacy, thanks to comments about her monologue performance on the Miss America stage and the stethoscope around her neck made by the television show The View. There are two sides to every story, and you are not going to want to miss her. Read more...
Speaker:
Kelley Johnson, BSN RN
CNE Hours
1
10:15 – 11:15 am Saturday, September 7

General Session: Emotional Intelligence: A Daily Practice (103)

Emotional Intelligence (EQ) relates to the capacity of individuals to recognize their own and other people’s emotions, to discriminate between different feelings, and to use emotional information to guide their thinking and behavior. Emotional intelligence is said to account for two-thirds of the abilities deemed necessary for superior performance in leaders and matters twice as much as technical expertise or IQ. Other studies point to emotional intelligence being 4 times more predictive of success than IQ.

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Speaker:
Niurka Rivero, MD
CNE Hours
1
7:30 – 8:30 am Friday, September 6

General Session: Controversies and Conundrums in the Use of Opioids in AYAs with Cancer (102)

This interactive session will equip pediatric oncology nurses with the skills that are essential in managing cancer pain while preventing abuse and diversion in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer. The first half of the session will include advanced didactic content on the pharmacologic management of pain. Opioids, coanalgesics, equianalgesic conversion, and opioid rotation will be reviewed. The second half will be devoted to complex cases with information about successful models to use when managing patients with or at risk for opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion. Improvs will be used to illustrate difficult conversations with patients who demonstrate aberrant behaviors. Read more...
Speaker:
Jeannine Brant, PhD APRN AOCN FAAN
CNE Hours
1
2:15 – 3:30 pm Thursday, September 5

Opening Keynote: The American Nurse: Stories of Life-Changing Impact (101)

Filmmaker, photographer, and author Carolyn Jones has spent the past 8 years interviewing more than 200 nurses from every corner of the United States—creating a book and a film called The American Nurse—in an effort to better understand the role of nurses in this country’s healthcare system. In this presentation, Carolyn will share stories of her experience as a patient—her first and most personal introduction to a nurse’s impact—followed by stories of nurses she interviewed and photographed for The American Nurse Project Defining Hope and, most recently, her in-progress documentary focused on emergency nursing.

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Speaker:
Carolyn Jones, BS, DFA(h)
CNE Hours
1
4:05–4:25 pm Thursday, September 5

Paper Presentation: Education Across the Cancer Care Continuum — Evidence-Based Interprofessional Palliative Care Education: Lessons for Pediatric Oncology Clinicians (204-2)

Clinician education and expertise in palliative care vary widely across pediatric oncology programs, creating disparities in accessing and delivering much-needed services to children and their families. Providing interprofessional, onsite team training, as well as institution-wide support for ongoing palliative care education, is critical to improving quality of life for pediatric oncology care recipients.

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Speaker:
Sarah Green, MSN CPNP-AC
CNE Hours
1
2:15 pm–3:15 pm Saturday, September 7

Engaging Pediatric Oncology Nurses in Multi-Site Clinical Trials (C234)

coglogoPediatric oncology nurses at 16 Magnet® hospitals are engaged in a three year, a multi-site research study funded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. This study is evaluating the effectiveness of two parent education discharge support strategies (PEDSS–symptom management vs. PEDSS–dealing with diagnosis) for parents of children newly diagnosed with cancer.

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4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

Shaping the Future with Clinical Trials: Empowered Nurses a Key to their Success (C223)

coglogoIn pediatric oncology, clinical trials are conducted to improve survival rates, understand disease biology, and prevent and/or improve management of treatment-related acute and long-term side effects. The majority of children newly diagnosed with cancer in North America are treated on Children’s Oncology Group (COG) clinical trials. In the last 50 years, clinical trials in pediatric oncology have increased the overall 5-year survival rate from under 10% to over 80% today.

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5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Infant ALL: Rearranged for the Big Screen! Providing Care on COG AALL15P1, Nurses in a Leading Role! (C211)

coglogoAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric malignancy, with 5-year overall survival rates exceeding 90% (Hunger, Lu, Devidas, Camitta, Gaynon, Winick, 2012). Unfortunately, infants with ALL are an exception to the improving survival trends and remain one of the most challenging populations in pediatric hematology/oncology (Kotecha, Gottardo, Kees, Cole, 2014).

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3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Navigating 131I-MIBG and CAR T 19, in COG trials ANBL1531 and AALL1721: Sharing Care and Strategies for Success (C205)

coglogoThe Children’s Oncology Group (COG) is committed to improving outcomes for pediatric oncology patients with the high-risk disease through clinical trials. Despite tremendous advancements in pediatric oncology treatment, survival in two patient populations remains inferior. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma have a projected 3-year event-free survival of 73% (Park et al., 2016), and patients with precursor B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with positive minimal residual disease at the end of consolidation have a projected 5-year disease-free survival of 39% (Borowitz et al., 2015).

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2:15–3:15 pm Saturday, September 7

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric/Adolescent/Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g., inpatient vs. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g., language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

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