Displaying items by tag: General Level

3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, August 17

A Sustainable Community Engagement Program Model to Address Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Education Needs for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (201)

1CH  Sickle cell disease (SCD) has often been called the “ultimate orphan disease” in the United States. The hemoglobin disorder affects nearly 100,000 people, yet in the 100 years since its discovery, there has only been one U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug. Recent advances in treatment have shown that hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers a possible cure. Yet, this therapeutic modality is significantly underutilized and lack of access to patient-centered HCT information remains a major barrier.

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2 – 3 pm Saturday, August 19

A Sustainable Community Engagement Program Model to Address Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Education Needs for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (231)

1CH  Sickle cell disease (SCD) has often been called the “ultimate orphan disease” in the United States. The hemoglobin disorder affects nearly 100,000 people, yet in the 100 years since its discovery, there has only been one U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug. Recent advances in treatment have shown that hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers a possible cure. 

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, August 19

Playing on Our Strengths – Developing Interprofessional Teams in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (227)

1CH  The care of pediatric hematology/oncology patients requires a diverse team of healthcare professionals. Interprofessional collaboration between these disciplines improves coordination of care, communication, and patient safety. However, the “how-to” of interprofessional team development is infrequently incorporated in healthcare professional training programs.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, August 19

Baseline Standards for Pediatric Oncology Nursing in Low and Mid Income Countries (226)

1CH  Approximately 80% of children with cancer live in low and mid-income countries, where survival rates are as low as 20%. These dismal outcomes are in sharp contrast with the remarkable improvements in survival noted in children who live in high-income countries. Nurses are crucial to the provision of quality pediatric oncology care, yet many nurses worldwide lack the essential education, support, and resources needed to reach their potential.

In response, baseline global standards for pediatric oncology nursing were published in 2014. The standards outline essential components of a quality nursing program, including safe staffing levels, formalized orientation and ongoing education, acknowledgment of nurses as core team members, available resources for safe care, and policies to drive evidence-based care.

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7:30 – 8:30 am Friday, August 18

Strengthening the Local Chapters of APHON through Networking (LCM)

1CH  The Local Chapter Committee Liaisons and Chapter Leaders will convene to discuss topics that affect the functioning of local chapters, such as fundraising, community service, education, and recruitment and retention. These will be discussed in a round table manner and then presented to the whole group.

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3 – 4 pm Friday, August 18

It's Not Just About The Medicine: Developing and Implementing Psychosocial Standards of Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families (220)

1CH  The Psychosocial Standards of Care Project for Childhood Cancer was inspired by the care experiences of a family whose son died of multifocal osteosarcoma at 7 years of age. Vicki and Peter Brown started the Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation in memory of their beloved son Mattie. The foundation’s mission is to “ensure that children fighting cancer and their families have a psychosocial voice and that these needs are addressed”.

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11:15 am – 12:15 pm Friday, August 18

The First 6 months: Health Care in the United States under a new President (213)

1CH  Implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 introduced significant change in health care in the United States. Some of the changes seen by many as desirable included elimination of lifetime maximum benefits, elimination of discrimination for pre-existing conditions, and the ability of young adults to stay on their parents' insurance until age 26.

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4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, August 17

Effects of a Spiritual Care Education Program on Pediatric Oncology Nurses' Level of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Competence (208)

1CH  Comprehensive nursing care of children with cancer at the end of life must embrace the physical, psychological, and spiritual needs of these special children and their families. Focus must be placed on providing support, reducing suffering, and enhancing quality of life. However, there are distinct barriers that lead nurses to feel unprepared to provide spiritual care to children and families: a lack of knowledge about the effects of spiritual care, a failure to recognize spiritual needs, and a lack of understanding of how to provide spiritual care.

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