Displaying items by tag: General Level

3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, September 13

Management of Retinoblastoma in 2018: A Nursing Perspective (201)

1CNE  Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary ocular malignancy of young children. Approximately 8,000 children are diagnosed with RB worldwide annually. If caught early RB can be cured, preserving life, vision, and the eye(s). At our institution, the treatment of retinoblastoma has evolved dramatically over the past decade. Utilization of focal therapies has transformed our treatment algorithms, patient outcomes and nursing care; our RB overall survival exceeds international rates. Localized treatments include chemotherapy administered directly into the eye via the ophthalmic artery or intra-vitreously, laser photocoagulation, cryotherapy, and, in cases of very advanced eyes, plaque brachytherapy or enucleation.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

1CNE  The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g. inpatient v. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g. language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

They Just Don’t Get It! Unconscious Bias in Caring for Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders (232)

1CNE  Caring for a child with serious illness, especially when cure is uncertain, may be one of the most difficult and yet most rewarding experiences for all members of the healthcare team. This presentation examines how unconscious bias, or our personal “blind spot”, from the perspectives of the hematology/oncology team, family members, and palliative care team interferes with the ability of the to accept and integrate palliative care for children with high-risk and advanced hematologic or oncologic diagnoses.

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2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Transfusions in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients: As Easy As ABO (231)

1CNE  Transfusion of blood products is an essential part of caring for children with benign hematologic disorders, malignant diseases, and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One challenge in pediatric patients is the broad age range for patients that span from neonates to young adults. Recent studies have shown that there is a wide variability in practice among pediatric programs in the indications for transfusions, CMV prevention, and management of patients who become refractory to transfusions.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Connecting Fun with Purpose: Interactive Teaching Strategies to Improve Bedside Care (225)

1CNE  The complex field of pediatric hematology/oncology truly demands clinical expertise of the bedside nurse to safely care for patients. Nurse educators are challenged more than ever to provide education in the classroom that will translate to meaningful application at the bedside (Curran, 2014). Current literature promotes learner preparation prior to class coupled with in-class interactive learning to apply and solidify knowledge (Galway, Corbett, Takaro, Tairyan, & Frank, 2014; Vujovic, 2016).

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7:00 – 8:15 am Friday, September 14

Strengthening the Local Chapters of APHON through Shared Experiences (LCM)

1CNE  The Local Chapter Committee Liaisons and Chapter Leaders will convene to discuss topics such as fundraising, community service, education, and recruitment and retention that affect the functioning of Local Chapters. These will be discussed in a round table manner and then presented to the whole group. Attendees will be able to take this knowledge back to their local chapters and continue forward thinking momentum, recruitment of new members, retain seasoned members, and implement a variety of fundraising and community projects for pediatric hematology and oncology families. APHON members interested in starting a new chapter will be exposed to the “Getting Started” process and a new bylaws mentoring round table will be added. All liaisons will be able to network with their local covered chapters to discover any potential issues and helpful knowledge in navigating rules and requirements for local chapters. We will discuss how to reformat and include innovative measures in the strategy meeting to encourage participation from new and seasoned members and to meet National APHON vision and goals.

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3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

PTLD: What's That About? (220)

1CNE Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication of solid organ transplantation. PTLD occurs in 2–15% of pediatric solid organ transplant (SOT) patients, depending on the organ transplanted and the immunosuppression used (Llaurador, 2017). The incidence of transplantation in pediatrics is steadily rising making PTLD the most common form of lymphoproliferation in childhood (Llaurador, 2017). Features of PTLD are similar to an immune system malignancy with abnormal proliferation of lymphoid lineage cells, typically B cells, in the setting of immunosuppression and often associated with EBV infection (Dharnidharka, 2017). Presentation and treatment choice covers a wide spectrum. The goal is to preserve the transplanted organ/graft while eradicating the lymphoproliferative disease. Most often the first intervention is reduction of immunosuppression (Dharnidharka, 2017) and is generally managed by the transplant team. Oncology providers become a prominent member of the multidisciplinary team for patients with more aggressive or disseminated disease.

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11:00 am – Noon Friday, September 14

Improving Access to Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Clinical Trials for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (214)

1CNE  Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common inherited hemoglobin disorder in the U.S., affects nearly 100,000 people. Yet progress for advancing curative treatments such as hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been limited in part due to the shortage of clinical trial (CT) participation by individuals most affected. How to improve clinical trial participation for patients is the $1 million dollar question for many healthcare providers. Participants attending this session will be able to identify evidence-based strategies to enhance patients’ trust and increase HCT CT participation.

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11:00 am – Noon Friday, September 14

Starvation, Death, and Destruction: The Battlefield of AVN (213)

1CNE  Avascular necrosis (AVN) results from the temporary or permanent loss of blood supply to the bone and can lead to bone destruction, pain, and loss of joint function. Most hematology/oncology nurses are aware that corticosteroid exposure and older age are risk factors for the development of AVN in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Are you familiar with other risk factors in children with oncologic disorders? Did you know that AVN of the femoral head is a common complication in children with sickle cell disease? While nonsurgical approaches may be appropriate in the early stages, surgical management is often required for more progressive disease. Through the use of interactive case studies we’ll review the common presenting signs and symptoms of AVN in children with both hematological and oncologic disorders, diagnostic workup and disease staging, and evidence-based management strategies.

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4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, September 13

Low Dose Ketamine Use in the Non-ICU Setting for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Pain (209)

1CNE  Managing severe pain in children, adolescents, and young adults with oncologic malignancies and sickle cell disease present a challenge to members of the multidisciplinary team. Traditional pain treatment strategies rely primarily on opioid analgesia (Wang, 2015) in addition to complementary therapies to provide comfort. Despite these interventions, many patients report inadequate pain control and adverse effects. These side effects can range from tolerable (pruritis) and dose-dependent (constipation) to life-threatening (respiratory depression, sedation). Refractory pain is a common reason for hospital readmission in this patient population, specifically in patients with sickle cell disease or patients being treated at the end of life. Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic used for sedation, has traditionally been administered in the operating room or in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting with stringent monitoring parameters. In patients with persistent pain despite traditional analgesic interventions, adjuvant therapy with low-dose ketamine infusions have proven beneficial (Hagedorn, 2016). Low-dose ketamine infusions are associated with opioid-sparing effects, improved pain management, and improvement in the child's ability to interact with their family (Finkel, 2007).

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