2:15–3:15 pm Saturday, September 7

Patient and Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric/Adolescent/Young Adult Oncology Patients: Development of an Interdisciplinary Education Roadmap (233)

The education of newly diagnosed pediatric, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) oncology patients and their caregivers is a critical component of successful oncology care. Patient education affects patient safety, timeliness and cost of care, treatment and research compliance, and the patient and family experience. Successful delivery of patient education is challenging because of the complex medical content conveyed, logistical challenges of healthcare delivery across multidisciplinary service lines (e.g., inpatient vs. outpatient with providers from medicine, nursing, psychology, social work), and patient and family variables that impact health and access to care (e.g., language, health literacy, coping skills, family and community support, insurance, financial stability, housing, transportation).

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

Creating the Spark - Inspire Learning with Interactive Activities for the Chemotherapy/Biotherapy Provider Course (226)

The 4th edition of the APHON Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Curriculum was published earlier this year. Extensive updates to the 4th edition book and live instructor course created a need to provide ongoing support for the 550 instructors as they familiarize themselves with the updated content and revised lectures. Central to the updated material is a focus on interactive teaching strategies.

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11:30 am–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

Diagnostic Dilemmas in Pediatric Oncology Patients with Rare Neurological Complications: A Complex Case Series Review (224)

Advanced Care Providers (ACPs) are experts at treating common conditions that children with cancer experience; however, unusual clinical presentations can create a diagnostic dilemma with subsequent difficulty in management. When a challenging diagnostic case is faced in clinical practice, or when a patient does not respond to first-line interventions for a complication, the ACP must be equipped to identify differential diagnoses and understand the appropriate evaluations. This presentation will review four children with cancer who had atypical neurologic complications or manifestations.

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4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

2nd Victims in Health Care: What does it mean and how is it affecting Nurses (219)

In an era of healthcare transformation, where transparency and high reliability are paramount concepts, the ideal healthcare providers are always held to is “do no harm.” Nurses continue to be the most trusted professionals and are held to very high standards, and with this comes the risk or consequence of losing that trust with any lapse in judgment, miss in critical thinking, or plainly being overworked or overwhelmed. In this session, we will look to explore the concept of the 2nd victim, which is when healthcare workers are involved in an adverse patient event and subsequently are traumatized by the event.

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4:15–5:15 pm Friday, September 6

Advances in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology in the Molecular Era (218)

Pediatric CNS tumors as a group represent the most common solid tumor in childhood and encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Recent advances in molecular profiling have led to significant changes in the classification of pediatric CNS tumors, with a positive impact on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Gliomas have undergone reclassification with emphasis on molecular profile over histology, leading to a redefinition of traditional low-grade versus high-grade glioma.

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Speaker:
Cheryl Fischer, MSN RN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
11:30 am–12:30 pm Friday, September 6

Foundations of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology (214)

Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors are a diverse group of tumors that together represent the most common solid tumor in children, with approximately 4,300 new cases diagnosed in the US each year. Management of children with CNS tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population beyond general oncology care.

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Speaker:
Cheryl Fischer, MSN RN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Global Health in Pediatric Oncology: A Practical Guide for Nurses (209)

In high-income countries (HIC), the survival of childhood cancer has reached over 80% in recent years. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), where the majority of the world’s children with cancer live, survival remains around 20%. Many hospitals and organizations in HICs have partnered with those in LMICs to help bridge this survival gap. Frequently, nurses from HICs who participate in these efforts have limited experience working in limited-resource settings.

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12:10–12:30 pm Saturday, September 7

Paper Presentation: Evidence for Practice and Global Health — Connecting Regional Nurses across Ghana: A Pediatric Oncology Nursing Educational Initiative (228-3)

Survival rates for children diagnosed with cancer in low and middle-income countries vary between 10% and 50%. In Ghana, a lower middle-income country of 35 million people in West Africa, approximately 1,300 children are diagnosed with cancer annually; many live in rural areas where access to pediatric oncology care is unavailable. Nurses across Ghana often care for children with cancer in settings without essential resources and with no pediatric oncology-specific education.

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5:20–5:40 pm Thursday, September 5

Paper Presentation: Evidence-Based Practice Projects and Quality Improvement Initiatives — Bridging the Gap: An Academic-Practice Partnership to Foster Confidence in Conducting Evidence-Based Practice Projects (210-2)

Partnerships between academia and practice can lead to improved patient care outcomes. Nurse educators in both academia and practice are positioned to facilitate opportunities for students and practicing nurses to be involved in evidence-based practice (EBP) care initiatives. Best practices in collaborative partnerships have demonstrated the significance of their far-reaching impact on students, nurses, patients, and health systems. However, many students and nurses still lack the confidence in initiating and carrying out EBP projects.

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4:25 – 4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Paper Presentation: Education Across the Cancer Care Continuum — Creating a Practical End-of-Life Care Mini-Workshop (204-3)

Fortunately, there have been great strides in the progress of treating children diagnosed with cancer during the last 50 years, with ever-increasing survivor outcomes. This is what every practitioner working in the pediatric oncology field strives and hopes for. And yet, despite the remarkable and increasingly sophisticated treatment options, not all children will survive their diagnosis with cancer. In general, nurses have more training, education, and skills with delivering chemotherapy, biotherapy, and other interventions than in providing end-of-life care.

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Speaker:
Leslie Griffith, BSN MA CPHON®
CNE Hours
0.33
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