Displaying items by tag: Advanced Level

2:15 – 3:15 pm Saturday, September 15

Are You an APN Searching for COG Supportive Care Guidelines? COG Guideline Development/Endorsement Process with Practical Applications (C234)

coglogo 1CNE Since the 1970s survival rates for most types of pediatric cancer have continued to improve, with about 80% of patients now expected to become long-term survivors. However, this incredible success requires intensive treatments that are often associated with significant acute and long-term side effects. These side effects of pediatric cancer therapy can negatively impact a patient’s symptom experience and quality of life. Lack of effective symptom management can potentially impact outcomes through delays in proven curative treatments, dose reductions, and patient nonadherence to the treatment plan.

Read more...
11:30 am – 12:30 pm Saturday, September 15

Impact of Donor Selection in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Outcomes (224)

1CNE Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is an important therapeutic option for children with malignant and nonmalignant disease. Over the past 50 years, there has been an increasing number of indications for HSCT. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched related donors offer the best outcome and frequently donors are siblings that are children. Haploidentical and unrelated donors have expanded the pool of donors. Improved HLA typing and posttransplant supportive care has improved the outcome of HSCT from alternative donors. The American Academy of Pediatrics published a statement regarding pediatric patients undergoing HSCT. The policy recommended new standards that had significant impact on both pediatric stem cell transplant physicians and parents. Choosing the appropriate donor depends on the patient and donor’s degree of HLA matching, sex, parity, blood type, CMV status, HLA directed antibodies, and the health of the donor.

Read more...
3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

New Hope Through Clinical Trials in Low Grade Gliomas: From Diagnosis, Standard Treatment Modalities, to BRAF/MEK Inhibitors (221)

1CNE  Low grade gliomas (LGG) are the most common type of pediatric brain tumor (Jones et al., 2017). Depending upon tumor location, many patients undergo surgical resection. If a gross total resection is achieved, patients receive MRI imaging. However, patients who have an incomplete resection or a recurrence receive additional therapy. Young patients with developing brains receive chemotherapy. Older patients may receive radiation. There are multiple agents or combination of agents that are administered in patients with LGG. Standard frontline chemotherapies are either Carboplatin and Vincristine or TPCV (Thioguanine, Lomustine, Procarbazine, and Vincristine). Other traditional single-agent therapies include Temodar, Vinblastine, or Vinorelbine. BRAF/MEK inhibitors (trametinib, dabrafenib, vemurafenib, and selumetinib) are currently being used in clinical trials (Penman, Faulkner, Lowis, & Kurian, 2015).

Read more...
3:15 – 4:15 pm Friday, September 14

Never a Dull Moment: Latest and Greatest Clinical Pearls for the APN (218)

1CNE  Advanced practice providers (APP) are consistently challenged to have the most current information on diagnosis, treatment, therapy delivery strategies, adverse effects management, and nursing led research from throughout the trajectory of a disorder. The purpose of this session is to provide APP-specific education and networking related to the complexities of children diagnosed with a hematological or oncological disorder. First, a quick primer on how to read and interpret peripheral blood smears and bone marrow biopsies, which will help with initial diagnoses of hematology and liquid tumors. After an initial diagnosis is made, genomic profiling of both liquid and solid tumors is increasingly utilized to identify molecular targets. The role of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in the ordering and interpretation of these tests will be explained. Next, the intricate transition from identification of mutations to selection of mutational targets with current medications in brain tumors will be discussed. In addition, the monitoring and treatment of the complex side effect profiles will be reviewed.

Read more...
11:00 am – Noon Friday, September 14

Managing Depression and Anxiety in Childhood Cancer (212)

1CNE  The period in which children are diagnosed with cancer and undergo treatment coincides with a time of critical physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social development. The mental health of children with cancer is particularly vulnerable due to the inherent uncertainties of the diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and disruption of their daily lives. Psychiatric diagnoses such as anxiety and depression are often underdiagnosed, undertreated, and extend beyond the conclusion of cancer therapy. This presentation will address appropriate screening and assessment tools to enhance the pediatric oncology nurse’s comfort in identifying pathologic depression and anxiety, exploring treatment modalities such as psychotherapy, psychopharmacology (including appropriate dosing and monitoring), and when to refer patients for further care.

Read more...
4:45 – 5:45 pm Thursday, September 13

Pediatric Cancer Predisposition: What the Clinician Needs to Know (206)

1CNE  Precision medicine has emerged with the advancement of genetic technologies and knowledge of molecular pathogenesis. A clinical translation of precision medicine in pediatric oncology lies in hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, which plague approximately 10% of patients and families. Proper identification of these patients, appropriate genetic testing and counseling, and an understanding of short-term treatment implications and long-term screening protocols are all essential to comprehensive care for patients and families with cancer predisposition syndromes. Current knowledge of pediatric cancer predisposition syndromes, referral and identification, and treatment and long-term follow up will be discussed. Moreover, a case series and easy reference tools for clinical practice will be presented.

Read more...
3:30 – 4:30 pm Thursday, September 13

Going Viral: Review of Viral Illness and Antiviral Therapy in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Pediatric Patients (200)

1CNE  Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at significant risk for developing serious and sometimes fatal infectious complications. Common viral infections post-transplant occur from reactivation of a dormant virus, including herpes simplex (HSV), Varicella (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus and Ebstein Barr Virus (EBV). Immunocompromised patients may also experience significant morbidity and mortality from common respiratory viruses, such as influenza, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Interventions vary greatly and can include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy or treatment of active infection. A variety of antiviral agents are now used including cellular immune therapy. A pharmacologic review will show that antiviral agents often have different dosage schemes, complex side effect profiles, and the need for supportive care.

Read more...

Bone Marrow Transplant for Hematology Patients: Caring for the Patient from Diagnosis to Long Term Follow Up (006)

3.25CNE  There are an increasing numbers of patients with hematologic transplant as a curative therapy, for previously life-threatening and life-limiting diagnosis. There continues to be advancement in this area on options available to patients to allow for overall increased survival and improved outcomes. With these new advancements, there presents a challenge to manage these patients effectively pre- and post-transplant to improve outcomes and survival. This presentation will provide an overview of transplant for hematology patients, which will include indications for transplant, criteria to qualify for transplant, pre- and post-transplant considerations (infectious, social, etc.), an overview of medications specific to hematologic conditions prior to transplant; types of transplants used, hematologic specific complications pre- and post-transplant, long-term follow up considerations in the post-transplant patient, and new and emerging therapies in the hematology patient and transplant.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed