Schedule

Preconference Courses (Wednesday, August 16)

Each preconference course is an extra-fee event and requires an additional application in order to enroll. Please click on each course title to view the full description and access the appropriate application form.

9:30 am – 4:30 pm

Self-Care for the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurse (001)

6CH  This workshop provides pediatric hematology/oncology nurses the opportunity to explore resiliency and self-care through self-assessments, individualized self-care planning and participation in a variety of experiential learning opportunities that strengthen resiliency by guarding against compassion fatigue, moral distress, vicarious trauma, and burnout.

Speaker:
Janice Nuuhiwa, MSN RN CPHON®
Teresa Conte, PhD MSN CRNP
10 am – 5:45 pm

Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructor Course (002)

6.25CH  The APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructor Course is designed for any nurse who has completed the provider course and meets the qualifications to be trained to teach the course. This course provides general instruction in adult education, guidance in the planning of lectures based on the APHON program content, and instruction in administering the provider exam. Successful completion allows nurses to return to their institutions as recognized APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructors who are able to provide ongoing instruction and education to other registered nurses.

10 am – 4 pm

Leadership Series: Building the High Reliable Teams (003)

5CH  In line with APHON’s mission to optimize outcomes for pediatric cancer patients, this workshop provides pediatric hematology/oncology nurses the opportunity to learn about the five High Reliability Organization (HRO) principles, apply them to building great teams and see how HRO practices impact quality and safety provided to patients, families, and staff in pediatric healthcare.

Speaker:

David Davis, MN RN
Chandra Broadwater, MPH MFA HACP
Edahrline Salas, BSN MA RN-BC
Becca McKnight, MHA HACP

Preconference Workshops (Thursday, August 17)

Each preconference course is an extra-fee event. Please click on each course title to view the full description. Registration for these courses is available in the online registration system of the pdf registration form.

8:30 am – 12 pm

Advanced Practice Providers in Hem/Onc/BMT—Expanding the Provider’s Horizons (004)

3.25CH  Advanced Practice Providers (APP) have a key role in the management of pediatric cancer and blood disorders.  APPs require ongoing education in the specific areas of diagnosis, management, and procedures.  Requested educational updates include management of oncology specific dermatologic complications, management of acute upper respiratory illness in the setting of immunosuppression, neurologic exam and pertinent associated findings, endocrinologic complications in the patient with cancer, thrombosis and management of central line associated clots, oncologic emergencies, and procedural practice of bone marrow aspirations, biopsies, and lumbar punctures.

8:30 am – 12 pm

Powerful Presentations: Strategies to Maximize Learning and Change (005)

3.25CH  In today’s continuing education environment, there are many options for innovative approaches to delivering presentations. It is important for faculty to understand why particular presentations strategies are effective in creating engagement and facilitating learning.  During this interactive session, participants will explore key factors that contribute to successful educational sessions based on adult learning principles.

Speaker:
Mary Lowe, PhD
8:30 am – 12 pm

Development of an AYA Program in a Pediatric and Community-Wide Setting (006)

3.25CH  Adolescence and young adulthood (AYA) is characterized by rapid cognitive, social, and emotional development, and as a result these patients often present with unique needs that are often challenging to support within traditional pediatric or adult settings. With approximately 70,000 new AYA cancer diagnoses a year, this group of patients is roughly 6 times larger than the pediatric oncology population (Nass, et al., 2015). Recent research has demonstrated that a substantial percentage of AYA cancer survivors report multiple unmet needs, including needs for information, practical support, social/peer support, and counseling/mental health services (Keegan et al., 2012). Additional research shows that clinical outcomes for AYAs have not improved as compared to pediatric and older adult oncology populations (Shaw, et al., 2015). Oncology centers are increasingly recognizing the unique aspects of cancer during adolescence and young adulthood, and, as a result, desire to improve the quality and age-appropriateness of care provided to this age group.

8:30 am – 12 pm

Palliative Care Challenges in Caring for Adolescents and Young Adults: Advance Care Planning, Spirituality and Moral Distress (007)

3.25CH  Cancer remains the most common non-accidental cause of death in childhood. In 2013, 627 children between the ages of 15 to 19 years of age died related to malignancies out of a total of 9,480 deaths in this age group (Osterman et al, 2015). Almost 10,000 young adults between 20-49 years of age die annually from cancer (SEER, 2016). Yet, clinicians remain reluctant to have difficult discussions with these adolescents and young adults (AYAs) (Rosenberg et al, 2016). Discussions with AYA can be challenging, as one strives to balance AYA autonomy with wishes of parents (Osterman et al, 2016). Advance care planning helps define goals of care so that the AYA’s wishes can be honored throughout the disease trajectory and at end of life. Spirituality may impact discussions, decision making and coping with the challenges of cancer for the AYA and the family.
8:30 am – 12 pm

Expanding Your Mental Health Toolkit: Innovative Approaches to Caring for the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients (008)

3.25CH  Although pediatric cancer survival rates have significantly increased over the past four decades, cancer treatments place patients at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms.  While there is limited longitudinal research on children and adolescents during active treatment, studies suggest that 10-15% of patients demonstrate increased symptoms of anxiety and depression.  Many within this subset exhibit significant psychiatric symptoms that necessitate intervention.
2 – 3:15 pm

Opening Keynote: Secrets Everyone in Health Care Needs to Know (101)

1CH  Join us for a humorous look at the realities of healthcare. In this session, we will unravel the secrets to working in today’s crazy healthcare environment. We will take a creative look at change, collaboration, and accountability. We will explore our legacy and why we are the way we are today. Come discover the secrets to excellent care, and learn how to put the energy back into ourselves and our team members.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

A Sustainable Community Engagement Program Model to Address Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Education Needs for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (201)

1CH  This session aims to increase awareness and application among hematology nurses of community engagement best practices. Participants attending this session will be able to identify an innovative partnership strategy to reach a historically underserved patient population with information to a curative therapy. Participants will also demonstrate an increased awareness and application of community engagement best practices.

3:30 – 4:30 pm

It's All GREEK To Me! The NEPENTHE Trial for Relapsed/Refractory Neuroblastoma; Personalized Molecularly Targeted Treatment (200)

1CH  Nearly fifty percent of patients with high risk neuroblastoma suffer a relapse of their disease despite intensive upfront treatment. Unfortunately, relapsed high risk neuroblastoma remains incurable in the large majority of patients. We have initiated a phase 1/1b investigational trial at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma, which provides patients with treatment that matches the genetic profile of their tumor. The NEPENTHE trial; NExt generation PErsonalized Neuroblastoma THErapy. In part one of this trial, a patient's tumor is sent for next generation sequencing-based cancer genomic profiling (NGS). This testing is designed to cover the spectrum of known cancer mutations. Patients who have mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase oncogene (ALK), RAS/MAPK pathway or who have TP53 wild-type neuroblastomas are eligible for this treatment. It is anticipated that 80-90 percent of patients screened will be eligible for one of the treatment arms. Based on the genetic mutations of their tumor, identified in the NGS, a patient is assigned to one of three treatment groups. Group one patients receive a combination of two medications – Ceritininb and Ribociclib (ALK). Group 2 patients receive single agent Trametinib (RAS/MAPK). Group 3 patients receive single agent HDM201(TP53 wild-type).

3:30 – 4:30 pm

Beyond Pain Crises: Acute Complications of Sickle Cell Disease (202)

1CH  Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited blood disorder in the United States. Although most children with SCD will now survive to adulthood, many will experience serious complications. Did you know that acute chest syndrome is the most common cause of death in SCD? Or how to determine if acute anemia is secondary to splenic sequestration or aplastic crisis? Other acute complications of SCD include infection, cerebral infarct, cholelithiasis and priapism. Through the use of interactive case studies we’ll review the presenting signs and symptoms of these acute complications, appropriate diagnostic work-up and evidence-based management. You'll leave this session confidently prepared to care for patients with sickle cell disease, beyond their pain crises.
3:30 – 4:30 pm

Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Hem/Onc/BMT Patients: An Update and Appraisal of the Evidence (203)

1CH  Efforts to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) have resulted in decreased rates, however, these hospital-acquired conditions remain a challenge for pediatric hematology/oncology/BMT patients. Although pediatric hem/onc centers have undertaken multiple interventions to reduce CLABSIs, the evidence base to guide CLABSI reduction efforts in this population remains limited.

3:30 – 3:30 pm

Paper Presentations: Hospital-Acquired Conditions and Challenges — Pediatric Patients Develop Clots? Identifying Events and Influencing Outcomes (204-1)

1CH  Pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with increased costs, morbidity, and mortality; however, its prevalence at Advocate Children’s Hospital (ACH) was unknown prior to joining the Solutions for Patient Safety (SPS). SPS is a national network aiming at reducing harm in pediatrics. In 2015, ACH had 18 hospital VTEs in patients 6 months through 17 years, the second most common hospital acquired condition for the hospital and the network.

3:50 – 4:10 pm

Paper Presentations: Hospital-Acquired Conditions and Challenges — Avoiding the Bite: Implementation of the St. Jude Advanced Warning Score (sJAWS) System (204-2)

1CH  8.5% to 14% of all in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests in children occur outside the ICU and the mortality rate for these patients is 50% to 67% (Murray, J., Williams, LA., Pignataro, S., & Volpe, D., 2015) making Pediatric Early Warning Scoring (PEWS) systems a high priority for hospitals. After identifying a need for timely identification and treatment of at-risk patients, a multidisciplinary team was formed to design, implement, educate and monitor a customized assessment tool and algorithm.

4:10 – 4:30 pm

Paper Presentations: Hospital-Acquired Conditions and Challenges — Applying Evidence Based Pressure Ulcer Prevention to Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients: A Pilot (204-3)

1CH  The Braden and Braden Q pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are currently utilized at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital to identify patients who are at risk for developing pressure ulcers.  During quarterly NDNQI surveys, over scoring of pediatric oncology patients by nursing staff has been documented.
3:30 – 4:30 pm

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Current COG Trials for T Cell, Ph+, and Ph-Like ALL (C205)

coglogo1CH  Although the current overall 5-year survival rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is more than 85%, patients with some subsets of ALL continue to have poorer event free survival (EFS). T Cell ALL, Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) and Ph-like ALL subtypes have suboptimal EFS rates and are the focus of new treatment approaches within the Children’s Oncology Group.

4:45 – 5:45 pm

GVHD Prophylaxis with Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide: Ambushing T Cells (206)

1CH  Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and is the leading cause of non-relapse mortality in patients surviving more than two years.  Acute graft versus host (aGVHD) complicates 40-50% of allogeneic blood and marrow transplants. The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research reports that approximately 35% of all allogeneic transplant recipients develop chronic GVHD (cGVHD). 

4:45 – 5:45 pm

Stop the Confusion! Understanding Delirium in Pediatric Oncology Patients (207)

1CH  Chronic and critically ill pediatric patients are at risk of developing delirium during a prolonged hospitalization. Previous studies concluded pediatric patients are more susceptible to delirium than adults, and those with cancer are at an even greater risk. Current research is focused on effectively preventing and treating delirium in children to avoid long-term sequelae.
Speaker:
Meghan Sturhahn, MSN CPNP-AC CPHON®
Nicole Kurtis, MSN CPNP-AC/PC CCRN CPHON®
4:45 – 5:45 pm

Effects of a Spiritual Care Education Program on Pediatric Oncology Nurses' Level of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Competence (208)

1CH  Comprehensive nursing care of children with cancer at the end of life must embrace the physical, psychological, and spiritual needs of these special children and their families. Focus must be placed on providing support, reducing suffering, and enhancing quality of life. However, there are distinct barriers that lead nurses to feel unprepared to provide spiritual care to children and families: a lack of knowledge about the effects of spiritual care on patient outcomes, a failure to recognize spiritual needs, and a lack of understanding of the best ways to provide spiritual care.

4:45 – 5:54 pm

Essentials of Genetics for Pediatric Oncology Nurses (209)

1CH  The role of genetics in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer continues to accelerate. As patient educators and advocates, Pediatric Oncology Nurses must understand the ever evolving diagnostic and treatment options available to our patient population. The genetics behind a child’s disease frequently impact the risk and treatment for that child.

4:45 – 5:05 pm

Paper Presentations: Medication-Related Issues — Single Institution Experience: Comparison of Heparin versus Ursodiol for prevention of VOD (210-1)

1CH  Basis of inquiry

Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Most centers use either low dose heparin or ursodiol prophylaxis to prevent VOD. In 2014, our center changed the VOD prophylaxis from heparin to ursodiol.

Speaker:
Lisa Pinner, MSN RN BMTCN® CPON®
Leigh Shinn, BSN RN CCRC
5:05 – 5:25 pm

Paper Presentations: Medication-Related Issues — Clinical Characteristics of Intravenous PEG-Asparaginase Hypersensitivity Reactions in Patients Undergoing Treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (210-2)

1CH  Asparaginase poses a substantial risk for hypersensitivity reactions; however, reactions vary by asparaginase type and administration route. Intravenous (IV) PEG-asparaginase has a higher hypersensitivity risk when compared to intramuscular administration.  It is imperative that nurses be knowledgeable of clinical symptoms associated with IV PEG-asparaginase reactions, as well as the typical timing of these reactions.  
5:25 – 5:45 pm

Paper Presentations: Medication-Related Issues — Medication Adherence in Leukemia Maintenance Therapy (210-3)

1CH  Poor adherence to oral chemotherapy during maintenance therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is significantly associated with relapse. A literature review and evidence summary, which was gathered and processed by a cross-campus Evidence-Based Practice workgroup (EBP), demonstrated that lack of understanding among patients and families about medication management is one of several significant barriers to medication adherence.
4:45 –5:45 pm

Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: Current COG treatment for a unique AML subtype (C211)

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1CH  Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a sub-classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), is characterized by the t(15,17) gene mutation. While survival rates for pediatric patients with newly diagnosed AML generally remain suboptimal, changes in treatment for the APL subtype, including the addition of Arsenic Trioxide (ATO), have improved survival rates to over 90%.1 Although its mechanism of action is not fully understood, ATO has demonstrated improved efficacy when used in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA).2 Treatment regimens for APL have historically included ATRA and anthracyclines as the backbone for all risk groups.

8:30 – 9:45 am

General Session: International Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing Initiatives: Challenges and Opportunities (102)

1CH  Since 1975, high-income countries (HIC) have made great strides in developing effective therapies to cure children and adolescents with cancer and enhance their quality of life. Unfortunately, this success is not mirrored in low- and middle-income countries (L&MIC), where approximately 80% of the world’s children with cancer live. To address this serious inequity, international collaborations (often referred to as “twinning partnerships”) between organizations and professionals in HICs and their counterparts in L&MICs have been underway since the late 1980s.

10 – 11 am

Town Hall: International Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing Education & Scopes of Practice (TH1)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to international pediatric heme/onc nursing education and practice.
10 – 11 am

Town Hall: DNP & PhD (TH2)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to the Doctorate of Nursing Practice and the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree programs.
10 – 11 am

Town Hall: Outpatient Nursing (TH5)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to outpatient nursing.
10 – 11 am

Town Hall: Advanced Practice Nurses (TH6)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to advanced practice nursing.
11:15 am – 12:15 pm

Nursing Management for the Successful Application of the Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Immunotherapy (212)

1CH  Immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has emerged as a promising modality of treatment for patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) malignancy. CAR T cells are patient derived T cells that are genetically modified ex vivo, using a retroviral vector, to specifically target cancer antigens on the surface of malignant cells.

11:15 am – 12:15 pm

The First 6 months: Health Care in the United States under a new President (213)

1CH  Implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 introduced significant change in health care in the United States. Some of the changes seen by many as desirable included elimination of lifetime maximum benefits, elimination of discrimination for pre-existing conditions, and ability of young adults to stay on their parents' insurance until age 26. 

11:15 am – 12:15 pm

BMT Sim Lab: Building Safety, Motivating Learning, Helping with Transition (215)

1CH  Literature shows that simulation-based nursing education and training is a widely accepted and highly effective way of teaching clinicians. Pediatric hospitals that perform stem cell transplantation (SCT) often find themselves struggling to train and validate nurses' competence. As a children's hospital of 259 certified beds seeking to improve the training and validation of nurses who perform and care for patients receiving stem cells, an interprofessional team was established to create an innovative clinical skills education and competency program using high fidelity simulation.

11:15 – 11:35 am

Paper Presentations: Health Promotion Challenges Across the Treatment Continuum — Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in a Pediatric Population of Children with Sickle Cell Disease (216-1)

1CH  Basis of inquiry

Sickle cell disease (SCD) may cause injury to any organ, including the auditory system. While the association of SCD and hearing loss (HL) has been described, the nature of this complication is unknown and no standardized screening guidelines exist.

11:35 – 11:15 am

Paper Presentations: Health Promotion Challenges Across the Treatment Continuum — Improving Body Function and Minimizing Activity Limitations in Pediatric Cancer Survivors: The Lasting Impact of the Stoplight Program (216-2)

1CH  Survivors pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) can have muscle strength deficits, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, and range of motion limitations months to years after treatment.  A proactive physical therapy intervention, The Stoplight Program (SLP) was implemented at a single institution with the goal of preventing and minimizing these deficits in body function and activity limitations.  

11:55 am – 12:15 pm

Paper Presentations: Health Promotion Challenges Across the Treatment Continuum — Feasibility and Acceptability of an Exercise Testing Protocol for Adolescents and Young Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia (216-3)

1CH  Exercise is challenging in SCA because of complications associated with chronic anemia. Individuals have difficulty self-managing their exercise because existing guidelines focus on avoiding complications and not on safely improving fitness.

12:15 – 1:30 pm

Annual Business Meeting and Awards Lunch (BUS)

Join your fellow members for a lively lunch and hear what's new from APHON leaders at our Annual Business Meeting. Be a part of the celebration as we recognize the hard work of your peers during our annual awards presentation.

Please note that while this optional event is included in the conference fee, selecting the event on the registration form is required to attend. Space is limited. 

3 – 4 pm

Zumab, Ximab and Umab: Making Sense of Monoclonal Antibodies (218)

1CH  The first monoclonal antibodies were developed in 1975 and despite the rapid utilization of these biological agents, they remain poorly understood by nurses who administer the agents. Monoclonal antibodies are a unique class of biological agents that have been developed for autoimmune disease, antitumor and antiplatelet therapy to name a few.  Antibodies produced by the body in response to an infection are polyclonal antibodies, meaning the antibodies produced are not identical.

3 – 4 pm

Managing Dyspnea in Children and Adolescents with Advanced Cancer and at End-of-Life (219)

1CH  Dyspnea in pediatric oncology patients with advanced cancer and at end-of-life has been well documented in the literature. In a landmark study by Wolfe et al. (2000), 65% of parents of pediatric oncology patients reported distressing dyspnea at end-of-life with less than 30% of those patients receiving adequate treatment. Frequently, children are undertreated, and occasionally over-treated, for their dyspnea due to an uncertainty of treatment methods and normal breathing patterns in a dying patient.

3 – 4 pm

It's Not Just About The Medicine: Developing and Implementing Psychosocial Standards of Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families (220)

1CH  The Psychosocial Standards of Care Project for Childhood Cancer was inspired by the care experiences of a family whose son died of multifocal osteosarcoma at 7 years of age. Vicki and Peter Brown started the Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation in memory of their beloved son Mattie. The foundation’s mission is to “ensure that children fighting cancer and their families have a psychosocial voice and that these needs are addressed”.

3 – 3:20 pm

Paper Presentations: Survivorship Care Issues — Childhood Cancer Survivors and Breastfeeding: Results of a Lactation Dysfunction Study (222-1)

1CH  Cancer therapies and/or endocrine-related late effects may affect successful breastfeeding. Specific lactation issues among female survivors of pediatric malignancies have not been well studied. Results of a cross-sectional survey of women who breastfed following treatment for childhood cancer will be presented.
3:20 – 3:40 pm

Paper Presentations: Survivorship Care Issues — Long Term Benefits of Attending a Weekend Childhood Cancer Survivor Family Retreat (222-2)

1CH  Cancer can strain family relationships, financial resources, quality of life, and coping potential. Weekend retreats for childhood cancer survivor families and other families of survivors can build lasting social networks, and assist with family cohesion lost during active cancer treatment, and enhanced quality of life.
3:40 –4 pm

Paper Presentations: Survivorship Care Issues — Explore the Challenges to a Successful Transition to Adult Provider Care in Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors and Parents (222-3)

1CH  Challenges exist for both young adult childhood cancer survivors (YACCS) and parents to a successful transition to adult care. This study explored these challenges using the components of the Social-ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition.
3 –4 pm

Nurse-Led Models for Enhancing the Conduct of Children’s Oncology Group Cancer Control Trials (C223)

coglogo1CH  Improvements in survival in pediatric cancer has led to a broadened focus of research that includes symptom prevention and management, patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes, and disease prevention and control. The Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Cancer Control (CCL) Domain conducts independent and embedded clinical trials to identify preventive measures and evaluate interventions to improve patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes and reduce the morbidity of cancer therapy.

6:30 – 7:30 pm

Strengthening the Local Chapters of APHON through Networking (LCM)

1CH  The Local Chapter Committee Liaisons and Chapter Leaders will convene to discuss topics such as:  Fundraising, Community Service, Education, and Recruitment and Retention that affect the functioning of Local Chapters.  These will be discussed in a round table manner and then presented to the whole group.

9 – 11 am

Town Hall: Stem Cell Transplant (TH7)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to stem cell transplant.
9 – 10 am

Town Hall: Social Media (TH8)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to social media in the workplace.
9 – 10 am

Town Hall: Sickle Cell (TH10)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to sickle cell disease care.
9 – 10 am

Town Hall: APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Instructors (TH11)

1CH More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to the APHON Pediatric Chemotherapy/Biotherapy Provider Course Program and Instructor Program.
9 – 10 am

Town Hall: Psychosocial Guidelines (TH12)

1CH  More informal in nature than our concurrent sessions, our Town Hall sessions give attendees the opportunity to engage in a lively discussion with industry experts covering the hottest topics in pediatric hematology/oncology. Attend this town hall to participate in discussions related to the Psychosocial Guidelines produced by the Mattie Miracle Foundation.
11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Baseline Standards for Pediatric Oncology Nursing in Low and Mid Income Countries (226)

1CH  Approximately 80% of children with cancer live in low and mid-income countries, where survival rates are as low as 20%. These dismal outcomes are in sharp contrast with the remarkable improvements in survival noted in children who live in high-income countries. Nurses are crucial to the provision of quality pediatric oncology care, yet many nurses worldwide lack the essential education, support, and resources needed to reach their potential.

In response, baseline global standards for pediatric oncology nursing were published in 2014. The standards outline essential components of a quality nursing program, including safe staffing levels, formalized orientation and ongoing education, acknowledgment of nurses as core team members, available resources for safe care, and policies to drive evidence-based care.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Playing on Our Strengths – Developing Interprofessional Teams in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (227)

1CH  The care of pediatric hematology-oncology patients requires a diverse team of healthcare professionals. Interprofessional collaboration between these disciplines improves coordination of care, communication, and patient safety. However, the “how-to” of interprofessional team development is infrequently incorporated in health care professional training programs.

11:50 am – 12:10 pm

Paper Presentations: Supportive Care Issues — Pediatric Oncology Providers’ Perspectives on Early Integration of Pediatric Palliative Care (228-2)

1CH  In many developed countries, great strides have been made in the treatment of cancer especially in children leading to increasing survival rates. Parallel advances in palliative care have also taken place albeit, at a slightly lower pace.

2 – 3 pm

A Sustainable Community Engagement Program Model to Address Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Education Needs for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (231)

1CH  This session aims to increase awareness and application among hematology nurses of community engagement best practices. Participants attending this session will be able to identify an innovative partnership strategy to reach a historically underserved patient population with information to a curative therapy.

2 – 3 pm

Leveraging Smartphones to Capture Symptoms During Advanced Cancer: Integrating an Innovative Idea Into A Grant-Funded Research Study (233)

1CH  Pediatric oncology nurses have an interest in developing research studies to address gaps in knowledge and improve patient care. Furthermore, nurses have identified smartphone technology as a potential tool for symptom assessment research. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the development of a research protocol based on a single innovative idea, review of the status of this active research study, and provide education related to the use of technology in nursing research.

3:15 – 4:30 pm

Closing Keynote: Deciphering the Intersection of Caring for Self & Caring for Others (105)

While the caring professions reap an abundance of benefits in the realms of compassion satisfaction and relationship building, they are also at risk for a multiplicity of professional pitfalls, such as moral distress, vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue and burnout. Oftentimes, the professional horizon where self intersects with others can be blurred or obscured, thus influencing the relationships between self and others.  We will honor the art of caregiving while reflecting on intentional self-care that could influence our professional horizon.