Concurrent Sessions

3:45-4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Managing Depression and Anxiety in Childhood Cancer (200)

The period in which children are diagnosed with cancer and undergo treatment coincides with a time of critical physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social development. The mental health of children with cancer is particularly vulnerable due to the inherent uncertainties of the diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and disruption of their daily lives.

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3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Self-reported Symptom Experiences and Self-management Strategies used by Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: What Can We Learn? (201)

Obtaining relief from symptoms of disease and treatment is essential to the quality of life of children, adolescents, and young adults (AYAs) receiving treatment for cancer. With person-centered care, clinicians must understand the individual symptom experience of every child and AYA and promote optimal symptom management. Mobile technology-based resources, such as apps, are emerging as novel ways to support symptom reporting by patients during and between clinical encounters and to teach symptom self-management skills.

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3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Back to Basics: The ABCs of CBCs (202)

The complete blood count (CBC) is the most common test ordered on our patients. Most hematology/oncology nurses only glance briefly, however, at a patient’s CBC to determine if they meet criteria for chemotherapy administration, blood transfusion, or emergent antibiotics. Have you ever looked beyond the Hgb, PLT, and ANC and wondered what the MCV or IPF may indicate?

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Speaker:
Karyn Brundige, MSN CPNP
CNE Hours
1
3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Implementing the USP 800 Guidelines: What does it mean for pediatric nurses? (203)

The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has put forth new guidelines for the handling of medications that have been deemed hazardous by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), known as USP 800. All healthcare and manufacturing institutions are mandated to implement the guidelines by December 2019.

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5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Symptom Assessment and Associated Biomarkers (206)

Altered sleep and increased fatigue are reported as two of the most distressing symptoms during treatment and into survivorship. Prevalence of disrupted sleep and fatigue have been reported to be higher among patients treated for CNS tumors, those treated with radiation therapy, solid tumors, and Hodgkin Lymphoma; however, changes in sleep and fatigue have been reported across all cancer diagnoses. To elucidate the biological mechanism underlying these symptoms, symptom science has evolved from descriptive studies of symptom occurrence to the measurement of biological processes.

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5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Non-Pharmacologic Treatment of Pain in Sickle Cell Disease (207)

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by episodes of severe and unpredictable pain that requires adaptation to remain healthy and functional. A more holistic view of pain assessment and treatment is necessary to address the bio-psychosocial needs of the individual in or at risk for pain. The treatment of SCD should include all available modalities to enhance the disease process, pain management, and psychosocial functioning.

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Speaker:
Megan Coco, MSN RN CPNP-PC
CNE Hours
1
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Decoding the Mystery of Gene Therapy – An Overview for Nursing (208)

The decoding of the human genome has provided scientists and researchers a new pathway to developing potential curative therapies for life-threatening or otherwise fatal illnesses. The development of these gene therapies is moving at lightning speed, translating this novel therapy from the bench to the bedside at a record pace. What was once thought of as a highly experimental approach, these therapies are quickly becoming standard of care, as demonstrated by the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of several gene therapies, specifically Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. These therapies are complex both in their scientific development and, more importantly, in their clinical delivery.

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Speaker:
Colleen Dansereau, MSN RN CPN
CNE Hours
1
5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Global Health in Pediatric Oncology: A Practical Guide for Nurses (209)

In high-income countries (HIC), the survival of childhood cancer has reached over 80% in recent years. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), where the majority of the world’s children with cancer live, survival remains around 20%. Many hospitals and organizations in HICs have partnered with those in LMICs to help bridge this survival gap. Frequently, nurses from HICs who participate in these efforts have limited experience working in limited-resource settings.

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3:45–4:45 pm Thursday, September 5

Navigating 131I-MIBG and CAR T 19, in COG trials ANBL1531 and AALL1721: Sharing Care and Strategies for Success (C205)

coglogoThe Children’s Oncology Group (COG) is committed to improving outcomes for pediatric oncology patients with the high-risk disease through clinical trials. Despite tremendous advancements in pediatric oncology treatment, survival in two patient populations remains inferior. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma have a projected 3-year event-free survival of 73% (Park et al., 2016), and patients with precursor B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with positive minimal residual disease at the end of consolidation have a projected 5-year disease-free survival of 39% (Borowitz et al., 2015).

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5:00–6:00 pm Thursday, September 5

Infant ALL: Rearranged for the Big Screen! Providing Care on COG AALL15P1, Nurses in a Leading Role! (C211)

coglogoAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric malignancy, with 5-year overall survival rates exceeding 90% (Hunger, Lu, Devidas, Camitta, Gaynon, Winick, 2012). Unfortunately, infants with ALL are an exception to the improving survival trends and remain one of the most challenging populations in pediatric hematology/oncology (Kotecha, Gottardo, Kees, Cole, 2014).

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